Tag: Open Theology

Open Theology – Call for “Topical Issues” Proposals.

Open Theology (degruyter.com/opth) invites groups of researchers, conference organizers and individual scholars to submit their proposals of edited volumes to be considered as topical issues of the journal. 

Proposals will be collected by October 31, 2021. 

To submit your proposal please contact Dr Katarzyna Tempczyk at katarzyna.tempczyk @ degruyter.com

Information about the journal and past proposals can be found here https://www.degruyter.com/journal/key/OPTH/html

OUR PAST TOPICAL ISSUES INCLUDED: 

2015:

  • Violence of Non-Violence (ed. Michael Jerryson and Margo Kitts)
  • Manichaeism – New Historical and Philological Studies (ed. John C. Reeves)
  • In Search of a Contemporary World View: Contrasting Thomistic and Whiteheadian Approaches (ed. Joseph Bracken)
  • Science and/or Religion: a 21st Century Debate (ed. Shiva Khalili and Fraser Watts) 

2016:

  • Cognitive Science of Religion (ed. Jason Marsh)
  • Is Transreligious Theology Possible? (ed. Jerry L. Martin)
  • Psychotherapy and Religious Values (ed. P. Scott Richards)
  • Bible Translation (ed. Mark L. Strauss)
  • Religious Recognition (ed. Heikki Koskinen, Ritva Palmen and Risto Saarinen) 
  • Religion and Race (ed. Daniel White Hodge)

2017: 

  • Multiple Religious Belonging (ed. Manuela Kalsky and Andre van der Braak)
  • Phenomenology of Religious Experience (ed. Olga Louchakova-Schwartz and Courtenay Crouch)
  • Analytic Perspectives on Method and Authority in Theology (ed. Joshua Farris and James Arcadi)
  • Alternative Religiosities in Soviet Union and Communist East-Central Europe (ed. Rasa Pranskeviciute and Eagle Aleknaite) 

2018: 

  • Cognitive Linguistics and Theology (ed. John Sanders)
  • Intersubjectivity and Reciprocal Causality within Contemporary Understanding of the God-World Relationship (ed. Joseph A. Bracken)
  • Rethinking Reformation (ed. Niels Henrik Gregersen and Bo Kristian Holm)
  • Religion in Latin America: Theological and Philosophical Perspectives (ed. Charles Taliaferro, Marciano Adilio Spica, and Agnaldo Cuoco Portugal)
  • Phenomenology of Religious Experience II: Perspectives in Theology (ed. Olga Louchakova-Schwartz and Martin Nitsche)
  • Recognizing Encounters with Ultimacy Across Religious Boundaries (ed. Jerry L. Martin) 

2019:

  • Digital Humanities in Biblical Studies and Theology (ed. Claire Clivaz and Garrick Allen)
  • Phenomenology of Religious Experience III: Visuality, Imagination, and the Lifeworld (ed. Martin Nitsche and Olga Louchakova-Schwartz)
  • Existential and Phenomenological Conceptions of the Relationship Between Philosophy and Theology (ed. Nikolaas Deketelaere, Elizabeth Li, and Steven DeLay)

2020:

  • Women and Gender in the Bible and the Biblical World (ed. Zanne Domoney-Lyttle and Sarah Nicholson)
  • Issues and Approaches in Contemporary Theological Thought about Evil (ed. John Culp)
  • Motherhood(s) and Religions (ed. Giulia Pedrucci)
  • Phenomenology of Religious Experience IV: Religious Experience and Description (ed. Olga Louchakova-Schwartz, Aaron Preston and James Nelson)

2021 (in progress):

  • The Bible and Migration (ed. Carly Crouch)
  • The Reception History of the Biblical and Patristic Heritage: Reflections on Theory an Method in a Burgeoning Field of Study (ed. Miriam Jane de Cock)
  • Women and Gender in the Bible and the Biblical World II (ed. Zanne Domoney-Lyttle and Sarah Nicholson)
  • Rationality and Religiosity During a Pandemic: Pehnomenology of Religious Experience V (ed. Olga Louchakova-Schwartz, Jason Alvis and Michael Staudigl)

Open Theology – Call for Papers: “Death and Religion.”

The theological journal, Open Theology invites submissions for the topical issue – “Death and Religion”. (https://www.degruyter.com/journal/key/OPTH/html)

Edited by: Khyati Tripathi, (UPES, India), Jennifer Moran Stritch (Limerick Institute of Technology, Ireland) and Peter G.A.Versteeg (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands).

Flyer: https://www.degruyter.com/publication/journal_key/OPTH/downloadAsset/OPTH_CFP%20Death%20and%20Religion.pdf

    Death and religion share an interdependent relation. Where death is an event or state that threatens to disintegrate worlds and meaning, religion can be seen as a practice that categorizes, consoles and makes sense of this kind of disintegration. According to Oxford dictionary, death is defined as “end of life”, but behind this simple definition, there is a web of complex ideas that could be understood from not just biological but also religious or cultural perspectives. Death has been conceptualized differently in different religious traditions as their texts and practices demonstrate. According to Lifton, religion is ‘life power’ and dominates death. Similarly, Davies put forth rituals as culture’s ‘words against death’.

     The relationship between death and religion should be seen as a broad scholarly query, which includes philosophical and theological questions, as well as more applied perspectives such as social work. Although death is a clinical process of organs that cease to function, dying and death are events that are surrounded by various sense-making practices, ranging from intricate traditional ceremonies as part of established religious repertoires, to more personal, individualized rituals. Social-cultural context, therefore, is of utmost importance to understand how we interact with dying persons and dead bodies, and why we do it in that particular way.

    In theology we see how faith traditions historically account for the reality of death, reflecting upon its existential meaning and thus trying to understand how to deal with the event of death. As such, a theology of death raises both practical (e.g. in spiritual care) and systematical (e.g. in ethics) questions regarding death and dying. 

     In psychology death anxiety or fear of death invited a great deal of interest starting in the late 1950s with Fiefel’s work on death anxiety and religion. Different studies pointed at different relationships between death anxiety and religiousness; some studies found a positive relationship between the two while others found an inverse relationship.  Some research argued for a curvilinear relationship between death anxiety and religiousness, explaining that moderately religious participants have more death anxiety than those who are extremely religious or not religious at all. The relationship between religion and death anxiety has been an inconclusive one because of the multidimensional nature of both religion and death anxiety. There is, however, a lack of scholarship on death anxiety and religion in non-western cultures.

    In cultural anthropology, death studies have developed into a substantial research niche. There has been ample attention for practices pertaining to e.g. the process of dying, death as transition, as well as to the interaction with the dead body. Important here, too, is the global perspective on death, also in the sense of engaging with ontologies of life and death outside of the established scientific-medical spectrum.

    This special issue encourages scholars from different disciplines, not just restricted to the ones we mentioned, to contribute to this debate. Of special interest are situations in which religion becomes overbearing and a burden to carry forward in times of death, or if religious practices are obstructed, for example, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. How do these crisis situations affect the relationship between religion and death? This special issue aims at invoking curiosity, enquiry and interest in looking at the different facets of this topic.

     The special issue on ‘Death and Religion’ invites empirical (qualitative and quantitative), review/conceptual and analytical papers focusing on the different facets of this relationship from scholars in different disciplines such as: Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, Theology, Philosophy, Cultural Studies, Thanatology, Health Humanities, Social Care and Social Work. Among others, topics or areas of focus might include:

  • Death anxiety and religiosity in non-western cultures
  • The different perspectives to ‘Extrinsic Religiosity’
  • Is ‘Intrinsic Religiosity’ really the reliever of anxiety?
  • Psychological/sociological/psychosocial significance of death rituals
  • The changing nature of death rituals
  • Personal religious beliefs and ideas about death
  • Belief in afterlife and death anxiety
  • The changing relationship between death and religion due to the COVID-19 pandemic
  • The non-religious traditions and death
  • Autoethnographic accounts of performing/witnessing death rituals
  • Death as latent and religion as evident in Freudian texts
  • Religious Literacy and the end of life care
  • Extinction as ultimate death and other morbid anxieties of the Anthropocene

Authors publishing their articles in the topical issue will benefit from:

– transparent, comprehensive and efficient peer review,

– free language assistance for authors from non-English speaking regions.

Because “Open Theology” is published in Open Access, as a rule, publication costs should be covered by so called Article Publishing Charges (APC), paid by authors, their affiliated institutions, funders or sponsors.

Authors without access to publishing funds are encouraged to discuss potential discounts or waivers with Managing Editor of the journal Katarzyna Tempczyk (katarzyna.tempczyk@degruyter.com) before submitting their manuscripts.

HOW TO SUBMIT

Submissions will be collected from September 1 to October 31, 2021, via the on-line submission system at http://www.editorialmanager.com/openth/

Choose as article type: “Death and Religion”

Before submission the authors should carefully read over the Instruction for Authors, available at: https://www.degruyter.com/publication/journal_key/OPTH/downloadAsset/OPTH_Instruction%20for%20Authors.pdf

All contributions will undergo critical peer-review before being accepted for publication.

 Further questions about this thematic issue can be addressed to Khyati Tripathi at khyatitripathi27@gmail.com. In case of technical or financial questions, please contact journal Managing Editor Katarzyna Tempczyk at katarzyna.tempczyk@degruyter.com

Find us on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/OpenTheology

Call For Papers: The Bible and Migration (Open Theology)

Open Theology invites submissions for the topical issue “The Bible and Migration,”prepared in collaboration with the conference “The Bible on the Move: Toward a Biblical Theology of Migration,” held at Fuller Theological Seminary in January 2020.

This special issue asks how cutting-edge biblical scholarship should inform conversation about and action relating to migration in the twenty-first century, bridging the gap between biblical studies, theology, and activism. Articles should examine how the biblical texts reflect diverse migrant experiences, as well as ways in which these texts reflect theologically on migration and appropriate responses to it among migrants and host communities. Articles may also critically interrogate the Bible’s use in arguments over migration and migrants’ reception by host communities. For purposes of this issue, ‘migration’ is understood to include refugee movements, internal and external displacements, and a wide spectrum of voluntary and involuntary migration motivated by famine, war, economics, and other causes. Contributions from the perspective of the Hebrew Bible / Old Testament or the New Testament are welcome, as are contributions that seek to take the perspective of both into account.

Authors publishing their articles in the topical issue will benefit from:
* transparent, comprehensive and fast peer review,
* free language assistance for authors from non-English speaking regions.

Because Open Theology is published in Open Access model, as a rule, publication costs should be covered by so called Article Publishing Charges (APC), paid by authors, their affiliated institutions, funders or sponsors.

Authors without access to publishing funds are encouraged to discuss potential discounts or waivers with Managing Editor of the journal Katarzyna Tempczyk (katarzyna.tempczyk @ degruyter.com) before submitting their manuscripts.

How To Submit

Submissions will be collected by April 30, 2021, via the on-line submission system at http://www.editorialmanager.com/openth/
Choose as article type: “The Bible and Migration

Before submission the authors should carefully read over the Instruction for Authors, available at:
http://www.degruyter.com/view/supplement/s23006579_Instruction_for_Authors.pdf

All contributions will undergo critical peer-review before being accepted for publication.

Further questions about this thematic issue can be addressed to Carly Crouch at clcrouch@fuller.edu. In case of technical or financial questions, please contact journal Managing Editor Katarzyna Tempczyk at katarzyna.tempczyk@degruyter.com

Theology.News Will Start Posting Open Theology Table of Contents.

Theology.News will start posting table of contents content for Open Theology. Here are last years articles (2019) to get you started. Stay tuned for 2020.

Topical issue: Digital Humanities in Biblical Studies and Theology, edited by Claire Clivaz and Garrick Allen

The Digital Humanities in Biblical Studies and TheologyClaire Clivaz and Garrick V. AllenArticle Category:Editorial|Pages:461–465|Published online: 26 Nov 2019

Defining Digital Theology: Digital Humanities, Digital Religion and the Particular Work of the CODEC Research Centre and Network Peter Phillips, Kyle Schiefelbein-Guerrero and Jonas Kurlberg |Pages:29–43|Published online: 22 May 2019

Embedded, not Plugged-In: Digital Humanities and Fair Participation in Systematic Theological Research Matthew Ryan Robinson |Pages:66–79|Published online: 04 Jul 2019

Truth Communication in Times of Digital Abundance: A Practical Theological Perspective Thomas Schlag |Pages:420–429|Published online: 04 Nov 2019

New Digital Tools for a New Critical Edition of the Hebrew Bible Sarah Yardney, Sandra R. Schloen and Miller Prosser |Pages:80–94|Published online: 23 Jul 2019

Digital Tools for Working with New Testament Manuscripts Garrick V. Allen |Pages:13–28|Published online: 22 May 2019

The Impact of Digital Research: Thinking about the MARK16 Project Claire Clivaz |Pages:1–12|Published online: 05 Mar 2019

Digital Palimpsests: Mark in Trinity College Cambridge MS. O.9.27 Dan Batovici |Pages:107–115|Published online: 04 Jul 2019

The Bible in Arabic: Digital Resources and Future Challenges Sara Schulthess |Pages:217–226|Published online: 15 Jul 2019

Structural Visualization of Manuscripts (StruViMan): Principles, Methods, Prospects Saskia Dirkse, Patrick Andrist and Martin Wallraff |Pages:249–258|Published online: 03 Aug 2019

Spatial Analysis of New Testament Textual Emendations Utilizing Confusion Distances Vincent van Altena, Jan Krans, Henk Bakker, Balázs Dukai and Jantien Stoter |Pages:44–65|Published online: 04 Jul 2019

Presentation of the Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts: Bridging the Gap between Ancient Manuscripts and Modern Technology Stratton L. Ladewig and Robert D. Marcello |Pages:451–460|Published online: 26 Nov 2019


Topical issue: Phenomenology of Religious Experience III: Visuality, Imagination, and the Lifeworld, edited by Martin Nitsche and Olga Louchakova-Schwartz

Introduction to the Topical Issue “Phenomenology of Religious Experience III: Visuality, Imagination, and the Lifeworld” Martin Nitsche , Editorial|Pages: 403–404|Published online:21 Oct 2019

Objective, Intersubjective Mystical Relationships: Justification and Reality Michael Barber |Pages:198–216|Published online: 15 Jul 2019

God and Man as Unrepresentable Images Carla CanulloArticle Category |Pages:158–165|Published online: 28 Jun 2019

Dual Anthropology as the Imago Dei in Edith Stein Angela Ales Bello |Pages:95–106|Published online: 03 Jun 2019

The Way into Transcendental Philosophy from the Argument in Suhrawardī’s Philosophy of Illumination Olga Louchakova-Schwartz |Pages:278–298|Published online: 10 Sep 2019

Transformative Impact: The Environmental Significance of Religious Conversions Martin Nitsche |Pages:241–248|Published online: 23 Jul 2019

Transforming Representation: Jacques Derrida and the End of Christianity Martin Koci |Pages:116–124|Published online: 19 Jul 2019

Patheticness and the Mundane Phenomenalisation of Transcendence according to Kierkegaard Maria Gołębiewska |Pages:332–346|Published online: 02 Oct 2019

The Phenomenology of Sacrifice in Marion, Patočka and Nancy Petr Kouba |Pages:377–385|Published online: 05 Oct 2019

A Too-Future Eschatology? The Limits of the Phenomenology of Liturgy in Jean-Yves Lacoste Jan Černý |Pages:386–402|Published online: 21 Oct 2019


Topical issue: Existential and Phenomenological Conceptions of the Relationship Between Philosophy and Theology, edited by Nikolaas Deketelaere, Elizabeth Li, and Steven DeLay

Editorial Introduction to the Topical Issue “Existential and Phenomenological Conceptions of the Relationship Between Philosophy and Theology” Nikolaas Deketelaere, Elizabeth Li and Steven DeLay |Pages:482–485|Published online: 23 Dec 2019

Living in the Existential Margins: Reflections on the Relationship Between Philosophy and Theology J. Aaron Simmons |Pages:147–157|Published online: 04 Jul 2019

Kierkegaard’s Existential Conception of the Relationship Between Philosophy and Christianity Elizabeth Li |Pages:136–146|Published online: 15 Jul 2019

Sartre’s Godless Theology: Dualist Monism and Its Temporal Dimensions Renxiang Liu |Pages:182–197|Published online: 04 Jul 2019

The Event of Faith: The Transformation of Philosophy by Theology in Rudolf Bultmann Nikolaas Deketelaere |Pages:259–277|Published online:18 Sep 2019

Nikolai Berdyaev’s Dialectics of Freedom: In Search for Spiritual Freedom Raul-Ovidiu Bodea |Pages:299–308|Published online: 13 Sep 2019

‘No One Can Serve Two Masters’: The Unity of Philosophy and Theology in Ricœur’s Early Thought Barnabas Aspray |Pages:320–331|Published online: 01 Oct 2019

Michel Henry and Metaphysics: An Expressive Ontology Andrew Sackin-Poll |Pages:405–419|Published online: 04 Nov 2019

Another Name for Liberty: Revelation, ‘Objectivity,’ and Intellectual Freedom in Barth and Marion Kristóf Oltvai |Pages:430–450|Published online: 18 Nov 2019


Regular Articles

The Emotional Impact of Evil: Philosophical Reflections on Existential Problems Nicholas Colgrove |Pages:125–135|Published online: 28 Jun 2019

Panentheisms, Creation and Evil Robin Attfield |Pages:166–181|Published online: 28 Jun 2019

Being Gifted as Negative Certainty David Mark Dunning |Pages:227–240|Published online: 26 Jul 2019

Conflict Resolved: the Amity between Postmodern Philosophy and Theology in Gianni Vattimo’s weak thought Emil Halloun |Pages:309–319|Published online: 18 Sep 2019

Epistemological Reform and Embracement of Human Rights. What Can be Inferred from Islamic Rationalistic Maturidite Theology? Galym Zhussipbek and Zhanar Nagayeva |Pages:347–365|Published online: 18 Sep 2019

The Dialectic of Sin and Faith in “Being Able to be Oneself” Nikolaj Zunic |Pages:367–376|Published online: 16 Oct 2019

Pannenberg’s Doctrine of Resurrection as Science Jae Yang |Pages:466–481|Published online: 02 Dec 2019

Open Theology Issues an Invitation for Edited Volume Proposals; Deadline October 2020.

The Open Theology journal invites groups of researchers, conference organizers and individual scholars to submit their proposals of edited volumes to be considered as topical issues of the journal for 2021.

Proposals will be collected by October 31, 2020.

To submit your proposal please contact Dr Katarzyna Tempczyk at katarzyna.tempczyk@degruyter.com


Prior topical issues have included:

2015:
* Violence of Non-Violence (ed. Michael Jerryson and Margo Kitts)
* Manichaeism – New Historical and Philological Studies (ed. John C. Reeves)
* In Search of a Contemporary World View: Contrasting Thomistic and Whiteheadian Approaches (ed. Joseph Bracken)
* Science and/or Religion: a 21st Century Debate (ed. Shiva Khalili and Fraser Watts)

2016:
* Cognitive Science of Religion (ed. Jason Marsh)
* Is Transreligious Theology Possible? (ed. Jerry L. Martin)
* Psychotherapy and Religious Values (ed. P. Scott Richards)
* Bible Translation (ed. Mark L. Strauss)
* Religious Recognition (ed. Heikki Koskinen, Ritva Palmen and Risto Saarinen)
* Religion and Race (ed. Daniel White Hodge)

2017:
* Multiple Religious Belonging (ed. Manuela Kalsky and Andre van der Braak)
* Phenomenology of Religious Experience (ed. Olga Louchakova-Schwartz and Courtenay Crouch)
* Analytic Perspectives on Method and Authority in Theology (ed. Joshua Farris and James Arcadi)
* Alternative Religiosities in Soviet Union and Communist East-Central Europe (ed. Rasa Pranskeviciute and Eagle Aleknaite)

2018:
* Cognitive Linguistics and Theology (ed. John Sanders)
* Intersubjectivity and Reciprocal Causality within Contemporary Understanding of the God-World Relationship (ed. Joseph A. Bracken)
* Rethinking Reformation (ed. Niels Henrik Gregersen and Bo Kristian Holm)
* Religion in Latin America: Theological and Philosophical Perspectives (ed. Charles Taliaferro, Marciano Adilio Spica, and Agnaldo Cuoco Portugal)
* Phenomenology of Religious Experience II: Perspectives in Theology (ed. Olga Louchakova-Schwartz and Martin Nitsche)
* Recognizing Encounters with Ultimacy Across Religious Boundaries (ed. Jerry L. Martin)

2019:
* Digital Humanities in Biblical Studies and Theology (ed. Claire Clivaz and Garrick Allen)
* Phenomenology of Religious Experience III: Visuality, Imagination, and the Lifeworld (ed. Martin Nitsche and Olga Louchakova-Schwartz)
* Existential and Phenomenological Conceptions of the Relationship Between Philosophy and Theology (ed. Nikolaas Deketelaere, Elizabeth Li, and Steven DeLay)

2020 (in progress):

* Women and Gender in the Bible and the Biblical World (ed. Zanne Domoney-Lyttle and Sarah Nicholson)
* Issues and Approaches in Contemporary Theological Thought about Evil (ed. John Culp)
* Motherhood(s) and Religions (ed. Giulia Pedrucci)
* Phenomenology of Religious Experience IV: Religious Experience and Description (ed. Olga Louchakova-Schwartz, Aaron Preston and James Nelson)