Category: Events & Conferences

Call for Abstracts: 6th Annual Theistic Ethics Workshop

The following might be of interest to those doing work in Christian ethics or philosophical theology:

Call for Abstracts
6th Annual Theistic Ethics Workshop

College of William and Mary
October 22-24, 2020

Confirmed Speakers:
Lara Buchak (University of California, Berkeley)
Helen De Cruz (St. Louis University)
Christian Miller (Wake Forest University)
Derk Pereboom (Cornell University)
Samuel Fleischacker (U of Illinois, Chicago)

Goal: Contemporary philosophy of religion has been richly informed by important work in metaphysics and epistemology. At the same time, there has not been nearly as much work done at the intersection of philosophy of religion and meta-ethics or normative theory. To help inspire more good work in this area, Christian Miller (Wake Forest), Mark Murphy (Georgetown), and Chris Tucker (William & Mary) organize a series of annual workshops on theistic ethics.

Logistics: The 6th workshop will be held near the campus of William & Mary in Williamsburg, VA. We will begin with dinner and the first paper on Thursday, October 22nd and conclude at the end of the day on Saturday, October 24th. There will be four spots for submitted papers. All papers will have about 40 minutes for presentation and 40 minutes for discussion.

Themes: “Theistic ethics” is to be understood broadly to include such topics as divine command and divine will theories; God and natural law; ethics and the problem of evil; moral arguments for a theistic being; infused and acquired virtues; the harms and benefits of theistic religions; what mainstream moral theories imply about divine action; specific ethical issues in Judaism, Christianity, or Islam; and many other topics as well.

Applying: Those interested in participating should submit an abstract of 750-1,000 words and a current C.V. to Chris Tucker (cstucker@wm.edu) by May 1. Word or PDF file formats only. Please prepare abstracts for anonymous review.  For although the organizers seek to have a balanced program both in terms of topics and presenters, the initial stage of review will be done anonymously.  Questions about the workshop should be sent to the cstucker@wm.edu.

Notification will be made by June 1 at the latest. If your abstract is selected, we will cover your accommodation, meals at the conference, and travel expenses (international travel can be covered for at least one submitted paper). Co-authors are welcome, but only one author’s expenses can be covered. You do not have to send your paper in advance of the workshop, and it certainly can be a work in progress.

Supported by generous funding from William & Mary’s Philosophy Department and Theresa Thompson ’67.

 

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2020 AAR Annual Meeting Call for Proposals is Open

The 2020 AAR Annual Meeting Call for Proposals is open.

Proposals are submitted through PAPERS, the AAR’s Program Administration Proposal, Evaluation, Review, and Submission System.

The PAPERS System is open for submissions.

The deadline for submissions is Monday, March 2, 2020, at 5:00 pm Eastern Standard Time.

For help using PAPERS, view these instructions. If you have questions, please contact the Annual Meeting team.

 

CFP: “Evolution, Original Sin and the Fall” Conference at Saint Louis University

Call for abstracts: Evolution, original sin and the Fall

Time and location: June 22-23 2020, Saint Louis University, Saint Louis, Missouri

Plenary speakers:

Hans Madueme (Covenant College)

John Teehan (Hofstra University)

Can the concepts of original sin and the Fall be interpreted in the light of evolution, and if so, how? There is an ongoing discussion in philosophy and theology on the implications of evolutionary theory for theism. This conference seeks to bring together philosophers, theologians, and other scholars who work on the intersection of science and religion to examine theological concepts in the light of evolution, with a focus on original sin and the Fall. This conference also welcomes papers on other topics in theological anthropology, philosophy of religion, and science and religion that discuss the relationship between evolution and theism, including from traditions outside of Christianity.

Please submit an anonymized abstract of about 500 words as a pdf or doc(x) attachment, with “Evolution and theism” in the subject line, to deeptimemorality@gmail.com

Deadline: 15 February 2020

Notification of acceptance/rejection: 15 March 2020

Organizers: Johan De Smedt and Helen De Cruz, Saint Louis University

This conference is funded by the John Templeton Foundation.

CFP: ETS Far West Regional Meeting – Underrepresented Voices in Theological Education

Evangelical Theological Society
Far West Regional Meeting
April 3, 2020
Colorado Christian University

Conference Theme: Underrepresented Voices in Theological Education

Conference Speakers: Dr. Lynn Cohick, Denver Seminary; Dr. Michael Ortiz, Dallas
Theological Seminary; and Dr. Walter Strickland, Southeastern Baptist Theological
Seminary

We encourage papers on the conference theme to be submitted for consideration for
presentation at the meeting. Submission of papers on other topics is encouraged as well.
Full members of ETS, EPS, PhD students, and ThM students, please submit an
approximately 200-word abstract of your proposed paper by email to
ewaggoner@ccu.edu by February 12, 2020.

MDiv, MA, and BA/BS students should submit their full paper, along with a written
endorsement by a professor who has read the paper, in order to be considered. Please
submit the paper in a PDF form to ewaggoner@ccu.edu by February 5, 2020.

Please include the name, institution, and contact information on each proposal.
Submissions will be evaluated by a committee comprised of CBU Faculty and FWETS
Officers. Notification of acceptance or denial will be made via email by February 22,
2020. Conference presenters must be registered for the ETS conference.

Logos 2020 – Narrative, Personhood, and the Self – May 28-30, 2020 at the University of Notre Dame

Issues concerning “the self”—its nature, our knowledge of it, mechanisms for transforming it, and much else besides—are historically central and currently active areas of research in philosophy, theology, and psychology.  An increasingly important idea in all three disciplines is the view that narrative is somehow essential to the self and intimately connected with key aspects of the life and development of a person. Narrative, or the activity of constructing narratives, has been credited with all manner of different roles in our lives, from contributing to positive outcomes in the wake of trauma, to helping us make sense of and find meaning in our own actions and other events that make up our lives, to unifying our consciousness and explaining important aspects of our agency, to constituting us as persons. The 2020 Logos Workshop will bring together philosophers, biblical scholars, and theologians to discuss these and related issues about personhood, the self, and the role narrative might play in the construction and transformation of the self.

Logos 2020 will be the final, large scale workshop in this series at Notre Dame. We have run this conference since 2009, and it has been an important event in the life of our Center. Nevertheless, we feel that the time has come to draw it to a close. It has been an immensely rewarding experience, and we are thankful that we have been able to host it for so many years. We hope that the research and relationships cultivated and deepened at Logos will continue to grow even as our workshop comes to an end.

The workshop is open to all who wish to attend, but registration is required. Registration details.

ATTENTION: Because the number of registrants affects our costs for refreshment breaks and other aspects of the conference, and because workshop presenters come with the expectation that their work-in-progress will not be circulated beyond the conference attendees, we ask that you DO NOT REGISTER for the conference IF YOU DO NOT PLAN TO ATTEND. If you are not attending and want access to the papers, please contact the authors directly.

The Center for Philosophy of Religion is committed to accommodating people with disabilities. Workshop participants are more than welcome to contact us to discuss possible accommodations if needed.

For more details see here: https://philreligion.nd.edu/events/logos-workshop/logos-2020/?fbclid=IwAR060HFoDxa7MoPKwDBBl6PQ_nPvXk41vBBUkYj_sA1ecJpBCOf3nLS-oSg

Eleventh International Thomistic Congress

21-25 September 2020 | Rome, Italy

Theme of the 11th Congress: Vetera novis augere. The resources of the Thomist tradition in the current context.

The general scientific objective of the XIth International Thomistic Congress is to consider new perspectives in the study of Saint Thomas (interests, methods and results) in order to highlight the resources of the Thomist tradition in contemporary theological and philosophical debates.

Invitation

The Pontifical Academy of Saint Thomas Aquinas and the Thomistic Institute of the Angelicum invite you to the XI International Thomistic Congress, to be held in Rome from Monday 21 September to Friday 25 September 2020 (Pontifical University of Saint Thomas Aquinas in Urba).

A unique opportunity to share work, research and friendships with the best international specialists in the thought of Saint Thomas Aquinas.

The languages of the Congress are Italian, French, Spanish and English. Simultaneous translations will be provided for the plenary sessions.

Call for Contributors

Anyone wishing to take part in the work of the Congress (teachers, researchers, doctoral students) is cordially invited to propose a paper (25-30 minutes maximum, strictly). The full text or an expanded abstract of the presentation (between 1500 and 2000 characters, spaces included) should be sent to the following address: romathomism2020@gmail.combefore April 15, 2020. Please indicate the workshop (session section) in which this communication could take place (see the lists above under Afternoon Workshops, for each day). The response (acceptance/refusal) of the organizers will be communicated before 30 June 2020. The text of the accepted papers will be published in the Proceedings of the Congress.

Christology and Metaphysics: Thomism in Conversation

Thursday April 2, 2020. A colloquium on Christology & Metaphyics, co-hosted by the School of Divinity and the Thomistic Institute (Angelicum, Rome)

Emmanuel Durand, OP (Thomistic Institute)
“Should the Cross be the Revelation of the Trinity?”

Simon Oliver (Durham)
“’All things came into being through him’: Christological Metaphysics and the Doctrine of Creation”

Christoph Schwöbel (St Andrews)
“Taking the Form of a Servant – Kenosis and Divine Self-Giving in Thomas Aquinas and Martin Luther”

Thomas Joseph White, OP (Thomistic Institute)
“The Communication of Idioms: The Chalcedonian Tradition and its Metaphysical Implications”

The Trinity and the Kenosis of Christ

The Thomistic Institute Angelicum hosts a two-day conference.

Schedule

Friday, 21 February 2020

12:00 PM to 1:00 PM: Gilles Emery, OP
     Christ’s Kenosis: Biblical Exegesis, Christology, Metaphysics, and Trinitarian Theology in Saint Thomas Aquinas

1:00 PM to 2:00 PM: Lunch Break 

2:00 PM to 3:00 PM: Christoph Schwöbel
     “Taking the Form of a Servant” – Kenosis and Divine Self-Giving in Thomas Aquinas and Martin Luther

3:00 PM to 3:30PM: Coffee Break

3:30 PM to 4:30 PM: Emmanuel Durand, OP
     Should the Cross be The Revelation of the Trinity?

4:30 PM to 5:00 PM: Coffee Break

5:00 PM to 6:00 PM: Christophe Chalamet
     ‘A mediator involves more than one party’ (Gal. 3:20) – Kenosis and Covenant

Saturday, 22 February 2020

12:00 PM to 1:00 PM: Thomas Joseph White, OP
     The Two Natures of Christ in the Crucifixion

1:00 PM to 2:00 PM: Lunch Break

2:00 PM to 3:00 PM: Michele Schumacher
     Trinity in Balthasar and Aquinas

3:00 PM to 3:30PM: Coffee Break

3:30 PM to 4:30 PM: Bruce Marshall
     Personal Distinction in God and the Possibility of Kenosis

4:30 PM to 5:00 PM: Coffee Break

5:00 PM to 6:00 PM: Martin Bieler
     The Cross of Christ as a Trinitarian Act

Upcoming “Society of Christian Philosophers” Conferences and Extended CFP

There are two upcoming regional SCP conferences.

The 2020 Eastern meeting of the SCP will take place at the University of South Florida in Tampa, Florida from January 23-25.  The theme of the conference is “Philosophy and the Public Sphere,” and the website includes all details of the conference, including a full program.  Please direct all questions and kudos to Professor Dolores Morris at dgmorris@usf.edu.

The 2020 Mountain-Pacific meeting of the SCP will take place at Trinity Western University in Langley, British Columbia from May 8-9. The theme of the conference is “Philosophy and the Sciences.” Details on the CFP, keynote speakers, etc. are available on the website.  The conference will include panel sessions on “Teaching and Philosophy” and “Faith and Philosophy.”  Note that there is a new deadline for submissions: January 15, 2020.  All submissions should be either a Word or PDF file, prepared for blind review, and sent to myron.penner@twu.ca by the deadline.

Duke University Graduate Conference in Theology

March 20-21, 2020

Call For Papers

The sixth annual Duke Graduate Conference in Theology is pleased to invite proposals that engage the intersections of liberation, reconciliation, and Latin America. Proposals that engage these themes from a wide variety of disciplinary perspectives are welcomed including (but not limited to): systematic theology, liturgical studies, ethics, historical theology, world Christianity, political theology, and biblical studies.  Successful proposals will also show an appropriate level of engagement with experiences and voices from Latin American culture, people, and/or history. 

Submission Guidelines

Please submit paper proposals of no more than 300 words by December 20. Proposals should be emailed to dgct2020@gmail.com in the form of a Word document attachment. Please include your name, institution, and degree program in the e-mail. Proposals will be evaluated anonymously by peer review. Notifications of acceptance will be distributed by December 31, and final, full manuscripts will be due on 12pm, Monday, March 9. Presenters will have 15-20 minutes to present their papers in faculty-moderated panels. 

About the Conference Theme

March 24, 2020 marks the 40th anniversary of the martyrdom Saint Oscar Arnulfo Romero. During his time as Archbishop of San Salvador, Romero exhibited the rare and powerful combination of pastoral sensibility, theological attunement, and prophetic zeal, which he exercised on behalf of the poor and the oppressed people of El Salvador. The life of Romero is especially relevant today given current socio-political realities both in the U.S. and across the world, which make it seem almost impossible to pursue the work of liberation and reconciliation in tandem.The witness of Romero’s life and death continues to be a call for the church in Latin America and across the world to listen for the voice of Christ in the cries of the poor and the oppressed and to live in ways that bear witness to the liberating and reconciling work of Christ.

Paper Topics may include:

  • How can churches as ecclesiastical communities speak truth to power in a volatile society?
  • What role does violence play in our theologizing of history?
  • How have the themes of liberation and reconciliation that originated in the Latin American context been received in other regions of the world, such as Africa, Asia and Europe?
  • How have theological and ecclesial practice been shaped by anti-colonial thinking that originated in Latin America?
  • How do/can Christian ecclesial practices (e.g. worship) respond to social and systemic violence?
  • What forms of spirituality or religious practice have supported liberating and reconciling work?
  • How do practices of biblical interpretation shape the work of liberation and reconciliation?
  • Theology and advocacy for the poor and marginalized
  • Latin American theologies and lo cotidiano
  • Critical evaluation of the terms “liberation” and “reconciliation”

The Duke Graduate Conference in Theology provides an annual forum for graduate students from Duke and other institutions to promote and foster the exchange of ideas among those studying in various theological disciplines.

Thomas Aquinas and Christology

Conference Website here.

Ave Maria University, the Aquinas Center, and the Thomistic Institute

FEBRUARY 6-8, 2020

This conference considers a wide range of scriptural, historical, and systematic attempts at answering Jesus’ question and engages in the thinking of Thomas Aquinas on it. His teaching on Christ reflects a master of the sacred page who attended adroitly to the scriptural narrative of Christ’s actions and sufferings, pioneered in the West the recovery of ancient conciliar teaching, innovated in his Christological pedagogy, and elucidated Trinitarian, anthropological, sacramental, moral, and eschatological dimensions of Christology. Studying the mystery of Christ in dialogue with Aquinas can assist us in today’s crisis of Christology.

Keynotes by Bruce Marshall and Thomas Joseph White, O.P; plenaries include Oliver Crisp and Dominic Legge; many concurrent sessions.

CFP: Global Jonathan Edwards Congress 2020

From Philip Fisk:

It is with great pleasure that we hereby send you the Call for Papers for the Global Jonathan Edwards Congress 2020 from Monday 24 August to Friday 28 August, 2020. This congress will be organized by the Jonathan Edwards Center Benelux, headquartered at the Evangelische Theologische Faculteit, Leuven, in cooperation with the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, affiliated with the Jonathan Edwards Center, Yale University.

The theme of this congress is “Rationality and Spirituality: Retrieving Jonathan Edwards for Understanding Religion and Spirituality in Human Experience Today.” The congress seeks to create academic space for a multidisciplinary discussion that retrieves and leverages the robust nature of Edwards’s insights into a religious experience that is both rational and spiritual for the benefit of the humanities, church, and society.

Since spirituality reflects underlying beliefs about human existence and experience, there is a need for global theological reflection on the nexus between spirituality and rationality. Although post-Enlightenment thought bears a specious character and prejudice against Christian spirituality—even Christians are overly self-conscious of this burden, often “disenchanted” with medieval and early modern Christian spirituality—with postmodernity has come a renewed interest in spirituality. Some of the finest and most penetrating analysis of the rational and spiritual nature of religious experience is found in the writings of Jonathan Edwards, “America’s Augustine.” See Strobel, Neele, and Minkema, Jonathan Edwards: Spiritual Writings, The Classics of Western Spirituality (Paulist Press, 2019).

Please carefully consider whether the Call for Papers for this congress resonates with your own research – if so, it would be great if you could submit an abstract for a paper. A special issue of the online journal Jonathan Edwards Studies will be dedicated to publishing a select number of papers presented at the congress.

It would also be great if you could help us spread this Call for Papers in your network, sending it to people whom you know will be interested in this topic. The deadline for turning in proposals is 15 February, 2020.

Sincerely,

Prof. Dr. Andreas J. Beck, Co-director Jonathan Edwards Center Benelux
Prof. Dr. Wim van Vlastuin, Co-director Jonathan Edwards Center Benelux
Dr. Philip J. Fisk, Congress director Jonathan Edwards Center Benelux


Paper proposals should be maximum 300 words and fall within the theme of the congress, as described on the homepage.

Paper proposals can be submitted by email to papers@jedcon2020.be. Please attach two separate Word documents in one email.

  • Document one: Your paper proposal. Please include a bibliography with a maximum of five consulted sources. All references to the author should be removed from this document.
  • Document two: Your last name, first name, Email address, institutional address, the title of your abstract, the topic under which your paper falls, as well as a short CV (1 page max.).

Deadline: February 15, 2020

We will review all submitted paper proposals and you will receive a response by April 24, 2020. If your proposal is accepted, you will be invited to present your paper at the congress.

Please be advised that your presentation will be limited to approximately twenty minutes.

Tyndale Fellowship Conference 2020: “Doing Theology in a World on the Move – Migration, Borders and Citizenship”

Tyndale Fellowship Conference 2020

Doing Theology in a World on the Move – Migration, Borders and Citizenship

Monday 29 June – Wednesday 1 July 2020

High Leigh Conference Centre, Lord Street, Hoddesdon, Herts EN11 8SG

 

Tyndale Fellowship offers an opportunity to engage with the best of evangelical scholarship, and to meet other researchers from around the world.

In the new self, there is no Greek and Jew, circumcised and uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave, free, but Christ is all and in all.

It raises all sorts of issues when large numbers from a specific people group move outside their customary borders (irrespective of whether they are forced to move or do so voluntarily). In the past we have seen movements from wealthy and powerful parts of the world to less powerful areas (colonialism). Nowadays we also see the reverse (refugee crisis, economic migration). In response we have seen the rise of schools of thought such as post-colonialism, unhealthy nationalism, and also a reversal of internationalism.

There are no easy answers to complex questions, but as evangelicals, how do we think about these issues? What does Christ urge us to do? How does God’s Word help us to be shining lights? What are the parallels we see in Scripture? What are their limitations? Do we need to separate our ‘national identity’ from our ‘Christian identity’? How should we plead the cause of the orphan and the widow? Should we perhaps just concentrate on the Gospel opportunities which the migration phenomenon offers us?

For more information see here: https://academic.tyndalehouse.com/TFC-2020

 

 

2020 Barth Graduate Student Colloquium

The Center for Barth Studies at Princeton Theological Seminary is pleased to announce the fifth Karl Barth Graduate Student Colloquium to be held on August 19-21, 2020. This year’s theme is Barth and politics—broadly conceived as a constructive and critical engagement with Barth’s own politics, political theory, and political theology in conversation with contemporary conversations on the same. Over the course of three days, participants will have the opportunity to engage in an intensive student-led seminar and to get to know other up-and-coming Barth scholars. During the day, participants will take turns presenting papers and leading group discussion on an assigned portion of the text. Two senior scholars will supplement the student-led day sessions by providing evening lectures and opportunities to further the conversation.

We especially encourage women, people of color, international students, new voices, and other under-represented voices in the Barth discussion to submit proposals for this year’s colloquium.

Call for Papers

The text for the 2020 colloquium will be the essays found in Community, State, and Church. We are inviting doctoral students and recent graduates in the disciplines of theology, ethics, religion, and political philosophy. While we expect that all applicants will closely read Community, State, and Church in advance of the colloquium, papers may take up the political themes from anywhere in Barth’s corpus. Papers, therefore, are encouraged to be primarily constructive and thesis-driven, not exegetical. We hope that this set-up will foster fruitful and constructive conversations about the merits, utility, and limits of Barth’s own political thought in conversation with similar contemporary conversations.

Application Information: This colloquium is open to any doctoral student whose interests intersect with some aspect of Karl Barth’s theology. A focus on Barth’s theology in your dissertation is not required. ABD is preferred. Recent graduates may apply. Applicants are required to submit a CV and a statement of interest no longer than 750 words proposing a constructive paper on the colloquium’s theme. Applications should be sent to barth.center@ptsem.edu no later than Monday, March 2, 2020. Notification of acceptance will be made by Monday, March 30, 2020. Successful applicants will present a 20-25 minute paper and lead the discussion that follows. We especially encourage women, people of color, international students, new voices, and other under-represented voices in the Barth discussion to submit proposals for this year’s colloquium.

Cost: The colloquium begins Wednesday morning and concludes on Friday afternoon. All food and lodging during the colloquium will be provided. Lodging will begin on Tuesday evening, August 18. Modest travel stipends are also included.

Questions?: For more information see the Barth Center website or email barth.center@ptsem.edu.

Plenary Speaker – Hana Reichel

Dr. Reichel earned her ThD and MDiv from Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, holds a B.Sc. in economics from Fernuniversität Hagen and a BA (Vordiplom) in theology from Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn. Reichel’s published work includes articles on Karl Barth and the mission of the church, and a monograph titled, Theologie als Bekenntnis. Karl Barths kontextuelle Lektüre des Heidelberger Catechisms (FSÖTh, Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2015), eng. Theology as Confession: Karl Barth’s Contextual Readings of the Heidelberg Catechism. Her theological interests include Christology, scriptural hermeneutics, political theology, constructive theology, poststructuralist theory, and the theology of Karl Barth.

For more information see here: http://barth.ptsem.edu/event/2020-barth-graduate-student-colloquium

CFP: Engaging Particularities – Graduate Student Conference on Comparative Theology and Interreligious Dialogue at Boston College

In ritual, histories are made present, identity is conferred, community is constituted. Rituals mark life—births, deaths, and milestones in between. They connect some to the gods, send others to the Pure Land, and cast out devils and demons. Ritual remains one of the more enigmatic categories in the study of religion. Choices abound in defining, categorizing, and describing ritual and ritual spaces. Where do rituals happen, or not? What are the defining characteristics of “ritual”? Must religious traditions be inherently ritualistic? Do rituals abound outside of religious conceptions? What are the results of removing rituals from the traditional contexts? These considerations can be seen in a new light given the Western decline of institutional religion and its attending rituals.

How are rituals operative for religious communities today? What questions are raised, refocused, or answered in ritual encounters across religious boundaries? How do rituals mark—or subvert—insiders and outsiders, participants and observers? In what ways are memories handed down through ritual to communities of religious traditions?

Engaging Particularities XVIII invites scholars working in the fields of comparative theology, interreligious dialogue, theology of religions, religious studies, and missiology, to submit comparative proposals that consider the place of ritual in our world today, paying particular attention to the role rituals play in the formation of our identities, both personally and communally.

General Call

We also invite proposals on critical issues and themes from various disciplinary perspectives (such as but not limited to ethics, systematics, historical studies, biblical studies, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, etc.) in four areas: comparative theology, interreligious dialogue, theology of religions, and missiology.

Submission Guidelines

To submit a proposal, please email an abstract of no more than 250 words to epbcsubmissions@gmail.com by December 31, 2019. Please indicate whether you are submitting for the special focus or general call, and include your contact information, institution, and program. Funds are available on a limited basis for participants to help supplement travel expenses. For more information, please contact the Conference Director, Katie Mahowski Mylroie at mahowskm@bc.edu.

Engaging Particularities XVIII

CFP: Princeton Theological Seminary Graduate Student Conference 2020 -Christianity and the Social

Annual Princeton Theological Seminary Graduate Student Conference

March 27-28, Princeton, NJ

 

Call for Papers

 

Christianity and the Social

 

The planning committee for the annual PTS-GSC invites creative submissions which examine Christian reflection on social life, broadly conceived. Central Christian ideals involve ideas about social life—horizontally between humans, other creatures, and the earth, and vertically between humans, divine beings, and God. The Old Testament/Hebrew Bible portrays God’s social relationship with a variety of communities, especially Israel and its neighbors. These relations are mediated by covenants, lines of descent, temples, monarchies, and more. The New Testament portrays Jesus as inaugurating new social ties, turning strangers and enemies into friends and siblings. This cuts dramatically across religious, political, and ethnic lines.

 

Christian communities across the centuries have sought to apply what they take to be biblical and Christian ideals in the formation and regulation of their social lives. These social embodiments of Christianity have varied in interesting ways across time, culture, and place. Yet critics from without and within also note that Christian language and ideals often mask disturbing historical realities. Christians have often employed the language of these ideals in the service of empire, domination, slavery, and the like. Such a challenge raises important questions, both critical and constructive, and papers from a broad disciplinary range are welcomed, including but not limited to:

 

History
Biblical Studies

World Christianity

Religion and Society / Religion and Critical Thought

Political Theory

Theology
Ethics
Philosophy

Sociology

Spirituality

Practical Theology

Hermeneutics

 

We welcome proposals for 15-20 minute paper presentations. Please send paper proposals of around 300 words to andrew.peterson@ptsem.edu and nicola.whyte@ptsem.edu by December 15, 2019, stating your institutional affiliation and program.

 

Presentations are expected to be “on the way,” so to speak—they needn’t be publishable in their present form, but we do want well-formulated and thought-provoking presentations. They may explicitly address the conference theme, or they may demonstrate how the conference theme is reflected in a specific area of study. We encourage presentations related to seminar papers, comprehensive exam materials, or dissertation materials. We especially encourage proposals from underrepresented groups in the academy.

AAR Places QR Codes on Name Badges but Reverses Their Decision

An email sent to AAR meeting attendees


Dear 2019 Annual Meeting Attendee,

This year, AAR and SBL decided to try a one-year pilot program of placing QR codes on attendee name badges, as a number of other associations do. The pilot was implemented with the sole aim of promoting fair use of name badges, and not for tracking individuals, holding on to personal data, or policing—which would go directly against our values and philosophy. We deeply regret the unintended messages the pilot idea triggered and have immediately withdrawn it. We are sending the badges for the Annual Meeting without the QR codes on Monday, November 11. In this spirit, we thank our members for their responses. We assure our members that trust is part of our ethos and that we will keep striving toward it. The AAR takes seriously that it exists because of, and for, all its members and those interested in the academic study of religion.

Alice Hunt,

Executive Director

3rd Annual “Logia” Women Scholars’ Luncheon

Logia and the LA Theology Conference are hosting their third Women Scholars’ luncheon at Biola University on Thursday, January 16th, 12:45-2:00. This is a time for women in theology and related disciplines to come together over a meal for conversation, networking, and support. Theologians, Dr. Lucy Peppiatt and Dr. Esther Acolatse, will offer a brief word of encouragement during the meal. Women who aspire to become scholars in these disciplines are also welcome. Attendance at the conference is not necessary but RSVP by January 10th is required as space is limited. There is no cost to attend.

To register see the Eventbrite Page: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/3rd-annual-latc-women-scholars-luncheon-tickets-77800014939

Aberdeen: Towards the Future of Protestant Theology

4th–6th June 2020, University of Aberdeen

From the conference website:

Following in the wake of the recent celebrations of the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, this conference seeks to facilitate conversation concerning possible directions, opportunities, and challenges for theologies belonging to the Protestant confessions. Bringing together scholars from a range of traditions and contexts, it looks to explore core doctrinal topics, to provoke further thinking in the discipline, and to foster global research networks.

Conference Plenary Speakers—

  • Christiane Tietz, University of Zürich
  • Keith Johnson, Wheaton College
  • Susannah Ticciati, King’s College London
  • Simon Oliver, Durham University
  • Keri Day, Princeton Theological Seminary
  • Roland Chia, Trinity Theological College Singapore
  • Tinyiko Maluleke, University of Pretoria
  • Daniel Castelo, Seattle Pacific University
  • Makhosazana Nzimande, Rector of All Saints, Ladysmith, South Africa and Vice-Moderator of the upcoming Assembly of the World Council of Churches 2020
  • Sarah Stewart-Kroeker, University of Geneva
  • David Fergusson, University of Edinburgh

We expect to issue a Call for Papers in the near future to solicit several short paper presentations from postgraduate students.  More to follow!

Fuller Seminary 2019 Missiology Lectures: Becoming Digital Neighbors

MISSIOLOGY LECTURES 2019

How does technology enable or constrain me in loving my (digital) neighbor?

The 2019 Missiology Lectures will look at how emerging technologies shape human interaction and, more specifically, inform cross-cultural or interreligious encounters.

Join us for a gathering of leading scholars of technology as it relates to theology, religion, and formation, to explore the ways in which modern technology is neither solely a dehumanizing force in the world nor a mere instrument for evangelizing the world, but rather the very means by which incarnation living happens—the media in and through which human bodies love the (digital) other.

Conference attendees will talk about technology as they interact with theologians, educators, missionaries, and ministry leaders, as well as engage in hands-on Virtual Reality experiences.

Conference Organizers: Ryan K. Bolger, Kutter Callaway, Kirsteen Kim

FULLER studio is pleased to offer a selection of the recordings to be released in the months following the event. To stay updated on this content, sign up for the FULLER studio semimonthly email.

SPEAKERS AND ABSTRACTS

 Heidi CampbellHeidi Campbell

PROFESSOR OF COMMUNICATION AT TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY, COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS

When Religious Internet Memes about Mean: Loving the Religious Other

This lecture is based on research that explores the tendency for Internet memes about religion to promote problematic religious stereotypes. Specifically, this lecture investigates the role the Internet and social media plays in promoting incivility towards non-Christian religious individuals and cultures. The viral nature of Internet memes can encourage the circulation of biased narratives about the religious other online, which threatens our call to be neighborly to those treated with contempt in a digital age. By studying the dominant messages promoted by Internet memes about religion, especially related to Islam and Judaism, we see that online visual and textual discourse about minority religions within American culture relies on hostile tropes and biases about religious individuals. By investigating how such messages communicate about religious others in popular Internet memes, this lecture will ask how memes can be used as basis of dialogue that enable us to embrace and show care for the religious others in our midst, online and offline.

Respondent: Erik Aasland is affiliate assistant professor of anthropology and coordinator of global initiatives at Fuller Theological Seminary.

Pauline CheongPauline Cheong

PROFESSOR OF COMMUNICATION AT ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

Data, Discernment, and Duty: Illuminating Engagement in the Internet of Things

As contemporary technological innovations are embedded in our “smart” homes, schools and churches, sensors in our neighborhoods, and even microchipped in ourselves, what are the human capacities and knowledge needed to thrive in an era of Big Data and the Internet of Things? Drawing upon her empirical research on intercultural communication, social media, and digital platforms, Dr. Cheong will discuss opportunities and challenges in loving our neighbors in light of intensifying mediatization. Understanding evolving and relational practices of datafication will help shed light on newer constructions of knowledge and authority, including implications for missional engagement and service.

Respondent: Marcia Clarke is affiliate professor of practical theology at Fuller Theological Seminary.

Ilia DelioIlia Delio, OSF

JOSEPHINE C. CONNELLY CHAIR IN THEOLOGY AT VILLANOVA UNIVERSITY

The Techno Human: Better World or Deeper Problems?

There is no doubt that technology has become embedded in human life, from global communications to biomedical enhancements. It is estimated that by 2025 the quality of human life will be significantly improved for most of the global population. But will we have a more just and sustainable planet? However, the values of enhancement cannot supplant virtues of transformation. A world of compassion and forgiveness requires that we go against our nature, not extend our nature. It is going against our nature, however, that we seek to avoid; hence the lure of artificial intelligence. In this lecture, Dr. Delio will explore the resistance of nature to transcend itself apart from the radical otherness of God and engage the cosmotheandric vision of Teilhard de Chardin and his novel idea of Ultrahumanism.

Respondent: Veli-Matti Kärkkäinen is professor of systematic theology at Fuller Theological Seminary.

Angela GorrellAngela Gorrell

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PRACTICAL THEOLOGY AT TRUETT THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, BAYLOR UNIVERSITY

Back to the Future: Immortal But Not Fully Alive

Babel-fish earbuds. The Internet of Things. Generative Adversarial Networks. And on the horizon of technological and informational change—a vision of a new humanity—superhumans made immortal by robotic limbs, microchips, gene modification, and nanosystems. How do we share the gospel in a world where people think of death as a solvable problem? What has God done in and through Jesus Christ that speaks to a digital age? How do we tell the stories of what God is doing in a new media landscape? Together, we will consider why the pursuit of becoming fully human should eclipse the quest to become immortal and, in doing so, shape Christian witness in such a time as this.

Respondent: Wilmer G. Villacorta is associate professor of intercultural studies at Fuller Theological Seminary.

Madison GilbertsonMadison Kawakami Gilbertson

PHD STUDENT IN PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE AT FULLER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

CO-PRESENTING WITH SARAH A. SCHNITKER

Perhaps too often technology development has neglected the philosophical, moral, and virtue-related elements associated with its production, and therefore the potential for technology to facilitate more positive outcomes for youth has been overlooked. Drawing on the empirical research we have conducted as psychological scientists, we will explore how a virtue-focused approach to tech has the potential to facilitate positive character development outcomes. Instead of inhibiting virtue, how might technology facilitate and instill virtue among users? Rather than trying to persuade adolescents to turn off their devices (a nearly impossible task), we want to present character strength interventions where youth are already spending their time—on their screens. The present tech landscape, the development and outcomes from a virtue-focused technology app, and the missiological significance of this approach will be discussed.

Respondent: Susan L. Maros is Faculty Consultant and Affiliate Assistant Professor of Christian Leadership at Fuller Theological Seminary

NoreenNoreen Herzfeld

REUTER PROFESSOR OF SCIENCE AND RELIGION AT THE COLLEGE OF SAINT BENEDICT AND SAINT JOHN’S UNIVERSITY

A New Neighbor or a Divisive Force?

The term AI conjures images of robots or the quasi-human figures of science fiction and film. We imagine digital companions and co-workers that think and act like ourselves. This vision of AI seems to enlarge our neighborhood, giving us something we innately desire—an “other” with whom we can relate, as we relate to our fellow humans. However, there are two things wrong with this vision. First, without a sensate body, computers are incapable of feeling emotion, making them a poor substitute for human relationships. Second, this isn’t the AI we have. We most frequently encounter AI not in some quasi-human or even robotic form, but in faceless algorithms that aggregate our data and manipulate our behavior online. This AI not only fails to give us new neighbors to love but has proven, so far, to be an isolating and politically divisive force, separating us from the human neighbors we already have.

Respondent: Kirsteen Kim is Associate Dean for the Center of Missiological Research (CMR) and professor of theology and world Christianity at Fuller Theological Seminary.

Sarah SchnitkerSarah A. Schnitker

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY AT BAYLOR UNIVERSITY

Positive Youth Development and Technology: Developing Character in Youth in the Present Technological Landscape

Perhaps too often technology development has neglected the philosophical, moral, and virtue-related elements associated with its production, and therefore the potential for technology to facilitate more positive outcomes for youth has been overlooked. Drawing on the empirical research we have conducted as psychological scientists, we will explore how a virtue-focused approach to tech has the potential to facilitate positive character development outcomes. Instead of inhibiting virtue, how might technology facilitate and instill virtue among users? Rather than trying to persuade adolescents to turn off their devices (a nearly impossible task), we want to present character strength interventions where youth are already spending their time—on their screens. The present tech landscape, the development and outcomes from a virtue-focused technology app, and the missiological significance of this approach will be discussed.

Respondent: Susan L. Maros is Faculty Consultant and Affiliate Assistant Professor of Christian Leadership at Fuller Theological Seminary