Category: Call For Papers

University of St. Andrews – Call for Proposals: Course Development Grants in Science and Theology

The “New Visions in Theological Anthropology” project at the University of St. Andrews has announced a call for course proposals in Science and Theology.

Deadline 29 February. 

The project seeks to encourage research and teaching on science and theology/religion. We encourage the development of new courses which use empirical research in some aspect of theology/religion. While we are especially drawn to the pairings of (1) Moral Theology & Evolutionary Biology, (2) Spiritual Formation & Developmental Psychology, and (3) Ecclesiology & Cognitive Science, we welcome proposals for any syllabus that engages theology with behavioral science. Since developing any new course will take time away from other research, we have launched this series of Course Development Grants.

Full information about the Course Development Grants can be found here: https://set.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/course-development-grant/.”

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Theology & Pop Culture Series CPF: Theology & H.P. Lovecraft

Click here for this CFP: Call for Papers: Theology and H.P. Lovecraft
(For more on the larger “Theology & Popular Culture” series by Lexington Books / Fortress Academic, click here.)

Cosmic horror writer H.P. Lovecraft is the paragon of atheistic nihilism in fiction. For many, Lovecraft is diametrically opposed to everything most fundamental to Christianity, and the only way we might fruitfully engage with Lovecraft’s thought would be to categorically reject it. What hath Arkham to do with Jerusalem? But this volume will explore Lovecraft’s fiction and philosophy from the perspective of Christian faith, exploring ways in which Lovecraft’s extreme positions can helpfully illuminate the distinctives of Christian theology, through both agreement and disagreement. Even if Lovecraft’s sombre vision of the universe cannot be aligned with Christianity, Christian scholars may still value his contributions as those of a Hume or a Nietzsche–a respectable opponent who can sharpen thought and cast new light upon doctrine by way of polemical debate. And if, as is possible, Lovecraft represents a uniquely American, 20th-Century perspective on life and society, then it is even more incumbent upon theologians to attend to him.

The overarching task of the volume will be to show how Lovecraft can sharpen theological discourse, and to explain what so many theologians find appealing in Lovecraft’s corpus. The editor is looking for chapter contributions that deal directly with Lovecraft and the themes he broaches in some specific and circumscribed way. General or diffuse proposals will not be considered. The theological element need not be Christian, but the majority of the chapters will approach the subject from this angle. This is a scholarly project and all writers are expected to engage with the secondary literature as well as the primary texts.

 Possible topics include:

  • Lovecraft and Apologetics
  • Lovecraft’s Anti-theological Aesthetics and the Argument from Ugliness
  • Lovecraft, Nietzsche, the New Science, and the Death of God
  • Lovecraft and the Bible
  • Lovecraft and a Theology of Race
  • Depictions of Cult and cultus
  • Lovecraft and the Transcendentals
  • Lovecraft’s Appropriation of the ANE
  • Lovecraft and Theological Anthropology–The Value of the Human Person
  • August Derleth and the Christian Reinvention of the Cthulhu Mythos
  • Lovecraft and the Puritans

Please send a 1-2 page chapter proposal and CV to theologyandlovecraft@gmail.com.
Proposals will be evaluated and approved beginning March 1, 2020.

If your chapter is selected, be prepared to submit your draft by September 1, 2020. Chapters should be approximately 20 pages (5-6,000 words).

Call for Papers: Theology and Tolkien

No proper list of the greatest works of English literature in the twentieth century can exclude the works of J. R. R. Tolkien. His works are not only much-read and beloved, but also Hollywoodized (Peter Jackson), and have launched (or, perhaps, re-envisioned) an entire genre of fiction. As a result, they have made an indelible impression on popular culture, even more so after the release of Jackson’s films.

It is not surprising that Tolkien’s works are ever so subtly deeply theological. Though Tolkien (perhaps wisely) eschewed the outright Christian allegory of his friend-in-writing, C. S. Lewis, there is no doubt from the close reading of his works (as well as a consideration of his personal correspondence) that Tolkien’s world is deeply indebted to Christian theology—even if we may suggest that his work is the ‘Esther’ of the Inklings. Media derivatives, while hewing close to the source material, also put a unique spin on the works’ theology, even as it moves from books to movies to pop culture.

We invite submissions for a peer-reviewed volume on Theology and Tolkien for the Theology and Popular Culture series published by Lexington Books / Fortress Academic. The volume editor is Douglas Estes (associate professor, South University).

The primary objective of this book will be to investigate theological themes in Tolkien’s works—broadly defined—with an eye to pop culture. To help the reader understand the purpose of this book, the essays within will not interact with Tolkien the individual, or his historical background, only his narrative works and their derivatives. Essays will sit at an intersection of theology, culture, and narrative/film.

Essays should focus on the theology of works set within the Tolkien universe in any media, including but not limited to the literary works, the movies, the video games, and the artwork.

 

Although many of the projected essays will likely consider the primary works, we are especially keen to ensure at least a third of the essays consider theological aspects in Peter Jackson’s film trilogies; further, to have a few essays that use other starting points such as the legendarium, the art of Alan Lee or John Howe (or other), the languages or the culture, the video games, or other, for theological investigation.

Current contributors include Philip Ryken (author of The Messiah Comes to Middle-Earth), Alison Milbank (author of Chesterton and Tolkien as Theologians), and Lisa Coutras (author of Tolkien’s Theology of Beauty: Majesty, Splendor, and Transcendence in Middle-earth).

Possible topics could include:

  • Theology proper / the creation story in The Silmarillion
  • Eudaimonia and the Hobbit life
  • Just war/pacifism in LOTR/Hobbit/movies/legendarium
  • Theological anthropology of various races
  • Theology of friendship between humans, dwarves, elves/Samwise, Frodo
  • Divination and palantíri
  • Theological implications of Tolkien languages (Sindarin or the Black Speech)
  • The absence of God
  • Satanology and Morgoth (or Sauron)
  • Theology of hope in LOTR/legendarium
  • Angelology and the Maiar (Istari and/or Balrogs)
  • Original sin and Orc / Elf history
  • Light and hope in the art of Alan Lee
  • Sin/corruption and the rings of power/Nazgûl
  • Eternal life, the Grey Havens, and the extended narrative closure of Jackson’s ROTK
  • Justice, human economy in Jackson’s TDOS
  • Ecotheology and Ents
  • Two Towers and Augustine
  • Theological imagination
  • Theological appropriation of paganism
  • Theological theme in any work

(These are merely ideas to spur thinking, great ideas beyond these are encouraged.)

The target audience for this book is scholars of religion, theology, and literature, though given the topic essays are to be written in a manner accessible to the average educated reader and jargon-free. Prospective contributors should submit abstracts of 300-700 words and full CVs to theologyandtolkien@gmail.com by May 15, 2020. Contributors should expect to deliver full chapters of 5000–6000 words by May 15, 2021, with editorial revisions due by Aug 15, 2021.

About the Editor:

Douglas Estes (PhD, University of Nottingham) is associate professor of New Testament and practical theology at South University. Douglas has written or edited nine books; his most recent books are a Greek grammar resource, Questions and Rhetoric in the Greek New Testament (Zondervan, 2017), and an edited volume (with Ruth Sheridan) on narrative dynamics in John’s Gospel, How John Works: Storytelling in the Fourth Gospel (SBL Press, 2016). He is the editor of Didaktikos: Journal of Theological Education (Lexham Press) and a regular contributor to Christianity Today.

For more information see: Pop Culture and Theology.

CFP: Sacramental Life – A Journal Dedicated to Emerging and Historical Practices of Christian Communities

Sacramental Life: A Journal Dedicated to Emerging and Historical Practices of Christian Communities

Sacramental Life is seeking submissions for upcoming issues. Founded in 1988, Sacramental Life is one of two journals published by the Order of Saint Luke (OSL Publications). Distribution is to a number of university and seminary libraries in the United States as well as the members of the Order globally.

Articles should deal with some practice of Christian communities, especially but not limited to worship, para-liturgical practices, preaching, or the sacraments, and should be between 2000-3000 words in length. Submissions of newly written liturgical material, hymn texts, sacred art, and/or poetry, book reviews, and screen reviews are also welcome. Material first presented as a sermon is not generally accepted unless it has been rewritten in the form of an article. The themes and deadlines for upcoming issues are below:

Volume 32.1 (Lent-Easter 2020) “Confirmation and Christian Community” Submission Deadline: Sunday, March 1, 2020 

Volume 32.2 (Pentecost 2020) “Sickness, Death, and Dying” Submission Deadline: Sunday, April 26, 2020 

Submissions and any questions may be sent to the Editor of Sacramental Life, Br. Jonathan Hehn, OSL, at jhehn@nd.edu. Please submit all material in the form of an email attachment (.docx, .odt, or .rtf file format for documents, .jpg or .pdf format for images). Musical scores should be submitted both in an image format (such as a pdf) and in a MusicXML format.

Those interested in submitting book reviews should please contact Br. Daniel Klawitter, OSL, at poetdklawitter@gmail.com. Those interested in submitting screen reviews should please contact Sr. Heather Josselyn-Cranson, OSL, at hjosselyn@hotmail.com.

Call for Abstracts: 6th Annual Theistic Ethics Workshop

The following might be of interest to those doing work in Christian ethics or philosophical theology:

Call for Abstracts
6th Annual Theistic Ethics Workshop

College of William and Mary
October 22-24, 2020

Confirmed Speakers:
Lara Buchak (University of California, Berkeley)
Helen De Cruz (St. Louis University)
Christian Miller (Wake Forest University)
Derk Pereboom (Cornell University)
Samuel Fleischacker (U of Illinois, Chicago)

Goal: Contemporary philosophy of religion has been richly informed by important work in metaphysics and epistemology. At the same time, there has not been nearly as much work done at the intersection of philosophy of religion and meta-ethics or normative theory. To help inspire more good work in this area, Christian Miller (Wake Forest), Mark Murphy (Georgetown), and Chris Tucker (William & Mary) organize a series of annual workshops on theistic ethics.

Logistics: The 6th workshop will be held near the campus of William & Mary in Williamsburg, VA. We will begin with dinner and the first paper on Thursday, October 22nd and conclude at the end of the day on Saturday, October 24th. There will be four spots for submitted papers. All papers will have about 40 minutes for presentation and 40 minutes for discussion.

Themes: “Theistic ethics” is to be understood broadly to include such topics as divine command and divine will theories; God and natural law; ethics and the problem of evil; moral arguments for a theistic being; infused and acquired virtues; the harms and benefits of theistic religions; what mainstream moral theories imply about divine action; specific ethical issues in Judaism, Christianity, or Islam; and many other topics as well.

Applying: Those interested in participating should submit an abstract of 750-1,000 words and a current C.V. to Chris Tucker (cstucker@wm.edu) by May 1. Word or PDF file formats only. Please prepare abstracts for anonymous review.  For although the organizers seek to have a balanced program both in terms of topics and presenters, the initial stage of review will be done anonymously.  Questions about the workshop should be sent to the cstucker@wm.edu.

Notification will be made by June 1 at the latest. If your abstract is selected, we will cover your accommodation, meals at the conference, and travel expenses (international travel can be covered for at least one submitted paper). Co-authors are welcome, but only one author’s expenses can be covered. You do not have to send your paper in advance of the workshop, and it certainly can be a work in progress.

Supported by generous funding from William & Mary’s Philosophy Department and Theresa Thompson ’67.

 

2020 AAR Annual Meeting Call for Proposals is Open

The 2020 AAR Annual Meeting Call for Proposals is open.

Proposals are submitted through PAPERS, the AAR’s Program Administration Proposal, Evaluation, Review, and Submission System.

The PAPERS System is open for submissions.

The deadline for submissions is Monday, March 2, 2020, at 5:00 pm Eastern Standard Time.

For help using PAPERS, view these instructions. If you have questions, please contact the Annual Meeting team.

 

CFP: “Evolution, Original Sin and the Fall” Conference at Saint Louis University

Call for abstracts: Evolution, original sin and the Fall

Time and location: June 22-23 2020, Saint Louis University, Saint Louis, Missouri

Plenary speakers:

Hans Madueme (Covenant College)

John Teehan (Hofstra University)

Can the concepts of original sin and the Fall be interpreted in the light of evolution, and if so, how? There is an ongoing discussion in philosophy and theology on the implications of evolutionary theory for theism. This conference seeks to bring together philosophers, theologians, and other scholars who work on the intersection of science and religion to examine theological concepts in the light of evolution, with a focus on original sin and the Fall. This conference also welcomes papers on other topics in theological anthropology, philosophy of religion, and science and religion that discuss the relationship between evolution and theism, including from traditions outside of Christianity.

Please submit an anonymized abstract of about 500 words as a pdf or doc(x) attachment, with “Evolution and theism” in the subject line, to deeptimemorality@gmail.com

Deadline: 15 February 2020

Notification of acceptance/rejection: 15 March 2020

Organizers: Johan De Smedt and Helen De Cruz, Saint Louis University

This conference is funded by the John Templeton Foundation.

CFP: Prize Competition for Feminist Analytic Theology 

Thanks to funding from the American Philosophical Association’s Diversity and Inclusiveness Fund, the editors of the Journal of Analytic Theology are pleased to announce a prize competition for the best paper in feminist analytic theology. We understand feminist analytic theology in a broad sense to also include intersectional perspectives.

Every eligible submission will be considered for the prize of US$500, and for inclusion in a special issue of the Journal of Analytic Theology. The special issue will contain the winning essay, as well as other essays that have received a positive evaluation. A board of experts with a broad range of specialisms in various theological traditions will evaluate the entries.

To compete for this prize competition, please send your paper to diversityjat@gmail.com with the subject line “Diversity APA prize competition” by October 1st, 2020. By submitting your paper, you agree that:

1.     Your paper will be considered for a special issue on feminist analytic theology.

2.     Your paper has not been published before and is not under consideration elsewhere for the duration of the assessment period of this prize competition.

Papers submitted after October 1st, 2020 will not be considered for the prize or special issue (but can still be considered for other issues of the Journal of Analytic Theology under the normal refereeing channels).

Eligibility:

Everyone, regardless of academic rank (e.g., graduate student, tenured, or tenure track faculty), seniority, or discipline (e.g., theology, philosophy, religious studies), geographic area, etc. can submit a paper. We particularly welcome and encourage people from groups who have been underrepresented in analytic theology to submit a paper.

We ask that there is no more than one entry per applicant. Co-authorship also counts as an application, and if co-authors win the prize, it will be split among them equally.

To be eligible, a paper must be 9,000 words or fewer and analytic. Analytic theology is an interdisciplinary subfield that explores traditional theological topics and questions (in diverse religious traditions) in conversation and methodological continuity with the analytic-philosophical tradition.

Review procedure:

Papers will be checked for being on topic and for basic quality. Papers that do not meet the criteria will receive a desk reject notice. Other papers will be refereed and the board of experts will decide on the winning entry. Given the anticipated number of submissions we do not anticipate that the board will provide feedback on rejected papers, though they may do so at their own discretion.  The winner will be announced by December 15th 2020.

For more details see: https://blog.apaonline.org/2020/01/23/competition-feminist-analytic-theology/

Call for Papers: E.J. Lowe’s Metaphysics and Analytic Theology (Theologica)

TheoLogica: An International Journal for Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology

CALL FOR PAPERS: E. J. LOWE’S METAPHYSICS AND ANALYTIC THEOLOGY

Guest editors: Mihretu P. Guta (Biola University, Addis Ababa University, & Azusa Pacific University) and Eric LaRock (Oakland University & University of Michigan, Center for Consciousness Science)

Edward Jonathan Lowe was one of the most distinguished metaphysicians of the last 50 plus years. He made immense contributions to analytic philosophy in as diverse areas as metaphysics, philosophy of mind, philosophy of language, philosophical logic, modern philosophy (especial on John Locke) and philosophy of religion. Lowe was a realist metaphysician. Like Aristotle, he thought that, with sustained reflection and responsible engagement with empirical research, the nature of a mind independent reality can be discovered. In all of this works, Lowe consistently maintained that our common-sense pre-philosophical convictions about reality should not be ignored unless there is a good reason to do so. Even in such cases, Lowe firmly believed that common-sense should rather be corrected and further enriched in light of relevant empirical discoveries. But Lowe never accepted the idea that, in light of the advancement of science, somehow we should entirely stop our reliance on common-sense in our inquiry into the nature of reality. Partly in defence of this very view, Lowe developed his most influential and highly original work: the four-category ontology. The gist of this work concerns metaphysics as an inquiry into the structure of ultimate reality (taken in general), provides a foundation for natural science. Lowe strongly believed that it is metaphysics not science that can set the terms for what is possible and not possible. Lowe believed that figuring out what actually exists in the natural world falls within the purview of science. On Lowe’s view, metaphysics and science can and should work in synergy, each playing its distinctive role in enhancing our knowledge of a mind independent reality. Lowe extended his realist view of reality to causation, laws of nature, modality, personal identity, logic, language, God’s existence, time and space, human ontology, properties and many other issues.

Lowe’s views on ontological issues also have direct implications for issues in philosophical theology as well as philosophy of religion such as incarnation, trinity and divine attributes. One of the things that makes Lowe’s work uniquely suitable to apply to various issues in either philosophical theology or philosophy of religion has to do with its systematic nature. Lowe built an extremely sophisticated ontological system as shown in his the Four-Category Ontology. In so many ways, Lowe’s highly original ontological system will prove relevant to address questions that arise in philosophical theology. Many contemporary metaphysicians influenced by Lowe’s system also have an interest both in philosophical theology and philosophy of religion, and have integrated elements of Lowe’s metaphysics in their treatment of these questions. Yet, to this date, no attempt has been made to take a general look at how Lowe’s metaphysics relates to various issues in the philosophy of religion. This is the first attempt to take concrete steps to fill in the existing gap in this regard. To this effect, we would like to invite paper contributions that connect any relevant aspect of Lowe’s work to any issue in philosophical theology or philosophy of religion, especially incarnation, trinity, divine attributes, human agency and divine sovereignty, unified experience and the existence of God, divine causation, divine temporality or atemporality et cetera.

Deadline for submissions: June 30th, 2020 Full papers should be submitted via our website: https://ojs.uclouvain.be/index.php/theologica/index or sent to: managingeditor.theologica@gmail.com . In order to contribute equally to scientific international discussions held in several languages, articles written in English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish are accepted. Visit the TheoLogica homepage for a description of the journal and instructions to authors.

For a brief biography on Lowe’s life and work, click on the link below: https://www.jstor.org/stable/43047040?seq=1#metadata_info_tab_contents For an extended discussion on Lowe’s work, click the link below: https://www.iep.utm.edu/lowe-ej/

Yours sincerely, Mihretu P. Guta & Eric LaRock

For the full call CFP see: file:///C:/Users/CWoznicki/Downloads/CfP-%20TheoLogica.pdf

CFP: ETS Far West Regional Meeting – Underrepresented Voices in Theological Education

Evangelical Theological Society
Far West Regional Meeting
April 3, 2020
Colorado Christian University

Conference Theme: Underrepresented Voices in Theological Education

Conference Speakers: Dr. Lynn Cohick, Denver Seminary; Dr. Michael Ortiz, Dallas
Theological Seminary; and Dr. Walter Strickland, Southeastern Baptist Theological
Seminary

We encourage papers on the conference theme to be submitted for consideration for
presentation at the meeting. Submission of papers on other topics is encouraged as well.
Full members of ETS, EPS, PhD students, and ThM students, please submit an
approximately 200-word abstract of your proposed paper by email to
ewaggoner@ccu.edu by February 12, 2020.

MDiv, MA, and BA/BS students should submit their full paper, along with a written
endorsement by a professor who has read the paper, in order to be considered. Please
submit the paper in a PDF form to ewaggoner@ccu.edu by February 5, 2020.

Please include the name, institution, and contact information on each proposal.
Submissions will be evaluated by a committee comprised of CBU Faculty and FWETS
Officers. Notification of acceptance or denial will be made via email by February 22,
2020. Conference presenters must be registered for the ETS conference.

Eleventh International Thomistic Congress

21-25 September 2020 | Rome, Italy

Theme of the 11th Congress: Vetera novis augere. The resources of the Thomist tradition in the current context.

The general scientific objective of the XIth International Thomistic Congress is to consider new perspectives in the study of Saint Thomas (interests, methods and results) in order to highlight the resources of the Thomist tradition in contemporary theological and philosophical debates.

Invitation

The Pontifical Academy of Saint Thomas Aquinas and the Thomistic Institute of the Angelicum invite you to the XI International Thomistic Congress, to be held in Rome from Monday 21 September to Friday 25 September 2020 (Pontifical University of Saint Thomas Aquinas in Urba).

A unique opportunity to share work, research and friendships with the best international specialists in the thought of Saint Thomas Aquinas.

The languages of the Congress are Italian, French, Spanish and English. Simultaneous translations will be provided for the plenary sessions.

Call for Contributors

Anyone wishing to take part in the work of the Congress (teachers, researchers, doctoral students) is cordially invited to propose a paper (25-30 minutes maximum, strictly). The full text or an expanded abstract of the presentation (between 1500 and 2000 characters, spaces included) should be sent to the following address: romathomism2020@gmail.combefore April 15, 2020. Please indicate the workshop (session section) in which this communication could take place (see the lists above under Afternoon Workshops, for each day). The response (acceptance/refusal) of the organizers will be communicated before 30 June 2020. The text of the accepted papers will be published in the Proceedings of the Congress.

Call for Chapters: Technology and Theology

Chapters along the lines of the theme of Technology and Theology may be approached interdisciplinarily from the Sciences, Humanities and Social Sciences and from the subdisciplines of computing science, biology, engineering, philosophy, theology, psychology, sociology, history, culture, art and ethics. There is a broad range of possible topics with some overlap. This list is neither exhaustive nor intended to be restrictive: Artificial Intelligence; AI, Consciousness and Soul; AI and Soteriology; AI and Eschatology; Genetics and Theology; Quantum Physics and Theology; AI and Transhumanism in the Movies; AI and Transhumanism on TV; AI and Transhumanism in Literature; Technology and Biblical Studies; Technology and Theology; Technology and the Church; Technology and Ethics; Technology and Education; Technology and Business; Technology and Sexuality; Technology and the Arts; Technology and Law; Technology and Philosophy; Technology and Fetishism; Social Media and Theology; Virtual Religion; Transhumanism and Soteriology; Transhumanism and Eschatology; Technology and Theology in Pop Culture. For guidelines and submissions email bill.anderson@concordia.ab.ca.

The deadline for chapter submissions has been EXTENDED to 31st January 2020.

About the publisher

Vernon Press is an independent publisher of scholarly books in the social sciences and humanities. We work closely with authors, academic associations, distributors, and library information specialists to identify and develop high quality, high impact titles.
More info at:
https://vernonpress.com/proposal/41/cdb13f465bbb120b500677391843bea7

 

Upcoming “Society of Christian Philosophers” Conferences and Extended CFP

There are two upcoming regional SCP conferences.

The 2020 Eastern meeting of the SCP will take place at the University of South Florida in Tampa, Florida from January 23-25.  The theme of the conference is “Philosophy and the Public Sphere,” and the website includes all details of the conference, including a full program.  Please direct all questions and kudos to Professor Dolores Morris at dgmorris@usf.edu.

The 2020 Mountain-Pacific meeting of the SCP will take place at Trinity Western University in Langley, British Columbia from May 8-9. The theme of the conference is “Philosophy and the Sciences.” Details on the CFP, keynote speakers, etc. are available on the website.  The conference will include panel sessions on “Teaching and Philosophy” and “Faith and Philosophy.”  Note that there is a new deadline for submissions: January 15, 2020.  All submissions should be either a Word or PDF file, prepared for blind review, and sent to myron.penner@twu.ca by the deadline.

Duke University Graduate Conference in Theology

March 20-21, 2020

Call For Papers

The sixth annual Duke Graduate Conference in Theology is pleased to invite proposals that engage the intersections of liberation, reconciliation, and Latin America. Proposals that engage these themes from a wide variety of disciplinary perspectives are welcomed including (but not limited to): systematic theology, liturgical studies, ethics, historical theology, world Christianity, political theology, and biblical studies.  Successful proposals will also show an appropriate level of engagement with experiences and voices from Latin American culture, people, and/or history. 

Submission Guidelines

Please submit paper proposals of no more than 300 words by December 20. Proposals should be emailed to dgct2020@gmail.com in the form of a Word document attachment. Please include your name, institution, and degree program in the e-mail. Proposals will be evaluated anonymously by peer review. Notifications of acceptance will be distributed by December 31, and final, full manuscripts will be due on 12pm, Monday, March 9. Presenters will have 15-20 minutes to present their papers in faculty-moderated panels. 

About the Conference Theme

March 24, 2020 marks the 40th anniversary of the martyrdom Saint Oscar Arnulfo Romero. During his time as Archbishop of San Salvador, Romero exhibited the rare and powerful combination of pastoral sensibility, theological attunement, and prophetic zeal, which he exercised on behalf of the poor and the oppressed people of El Salvador. The life of Romero is especially relevant today given current socio-political realities both in the U.S. and across the world, which make it seem almost impossible to pursue the work of liberation and reconciliation in tandem.The witness of Romero’s life and death continues to be a call for the church in Latin America and across the world to listen for the voice of Christ in the cries of the poor and the oppressed and to live in ways that bear witness to the liberating and reconciling work of Christ.

Paper Topics may include:

  • How can churches as ecclesiastical communities speak truth to power in a volatile society?
  • What role does violence play in our theologizing of history?
  • How have the themes of liberation and reconciliation that originated in the Latin American context been received in other regions of the world, such as Africa, Asia and Europe?
  • How have theological and ecclesial practice been shaped by anti-colonial thinking that originated in Latin America?
  • How do/can Christian ecclesial practices (e.g. worship) respond to social and systemic violence?
  • What forms of spirituality or religious practice have supported liberating and reconciling work?
  • How do practices of biblical interpretation shape the work of liberation and reconciliation?
  • Theology and advocacy for the poor and marginalized
  • Latin American theologies and lo cotidiano
  • Critical evaluation of the terms “liberation” and “reconciliation”

The Duke Graduate Conference in Theology provides an annual forum for graduate students from Duke and other institutions to promote and foster the exchange of ideas among those studying in various theological disciplines.

CFP: Global Jonathan Edwards Congress 2020

From Philip Fisk:

It is with great pleasure that we hereby send you the Call for Papers for the Global Jonathan Edwards Congress 2020 from Monday 24 August to Friday 28 August, 2020. This congress will be organized by the Jonathan Edwards Center Benelux, headquartered at the Evangelische Theologische Faculteit, Leuven, in cooperation with the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, affiliated with the Jonathan Edwards Center, Yale University.

The theme of this congress is “Rationality and Spirituality: Retrieving Jonathan Edwards for Understanding Religion and Spirituality in Human Experience Today.” The congress seeks to create academic space for a multidisciplinary discussion that retrieves and leverages the robust nature of Edwards’s insights into a religious experience that is both rational and spiritual for the benefit of the humanities, church, and society.

Since spirituality reflects underlying beliefs about human existence and experience, there is a need for global theological reflection on the nexus between spirituality and rationality. Although post-Enlightenment thought bears a specious character and prejudice against Christian spirituality—even Christians are overly self-conscious of this burden, often “disenchanted” with medieval and early modern Christian spirituality—with postmodernity has come a renewed interest in spirituality. Some of the finest and most penetrating analysis of the rational and spiritual nature of religious experience is found in the writings of Jonathan Edwards, “America’s Augustine.” See Strobel, Neele, and Minkema, Jonathan Edwards: Spiritual Writings, The Classics of Western Spirituality (Paulist Press, 2019).

Please carefully consider whether the Call for Papers for this congress resonates with your own research – if so, it would be great if you could submit an abstract for a paper. A special issue of the online journal Jonathan Edwards Studies will be dedicated to publishing a select number of papers presented at the congress.

It would also be great if you could help us spread this Call for Papers in your network, sending it to people whom you know will be interested in this topic. The deadline for turning in proposals is 15 February, 2020.

Sincerely,

Prof. Dr. Andreas J. Beck, Co-director Jonathan Edwards Center Benelux
Prof. Dr. Wim van Vlastuin, Co-director Jonathan Edwards Center Benelux
Dr. Philip J. Fisk, Congress director Jonathan Edwards Center Benelux


Paper proposals should be maximum 300 words and fall within the theme of the congress, as described on the homepage.

Paper proposals can be submitted by email to papers@jedcon2020.be. Please attach two separate Word documents in one email.

  • Document one: Your paper proposal. Please include a bibliography with a maximum of five consulted sources. All references to the author should be removed from this document.
  • Document two: Your last name, first name, Email address, institutional address, the title of your abstract, the topic under which your paper falls, as well as a short CV (1 page max.).

Deadline: February 15, 2020

We will review all submitted paper proposals and you will receive a response by April 24, 2020. If your proposal is accepted, you will be invited to present your paper at the congress.

Please be advised that your presentation will be limited to approximately twenty minutes.

CFP: Tyndale Fellowship Conference 2020 – Philosophy of Religion Abstracts

From Daniel Hill (Liverpool)


Dear Friends of Tyndale,

Next year’s Tyndale Conference is expected to be somewhat different from those of the last three years. We are due to meet together with all the other study groups (Old Testament, New Testament, Christian Doctrine, Systematic Theology, and Biblical Archaeology) at The High Leigh Conference Centre in Hertfordshire (https://www.cct.org.uk/high-leigh/high-leigh-conference-centre) from Monday 29th June to Wednesday 1 July 2020. There is an overall theme for the conference, ‘Doing Theology in a World on the Move – Migration, Borders and Citizenship’ (https://academic.tyndalehouse.com/TFC-2020), but there is no requirement for this to be the subject of any paper in Philosophy. The PhilEvents page for the conference is https://philevents.org/event/show/78474, and the PhilEvents page for the Call for Abstracts is https://philevents.org/event/show/78582.

We are delighted to announce that our plenary speaker for Philosophy is due to be Prof. Dr Dr Daniel von Wachter (http://von-wachter.de/), Director of the Institute for Academic Philosophy in Liechtenstein (http://iap.li/en/#pll_switcher). He is expected to speak at the end of the conference on Wednesday. It is a great honour for Tyndale that Prof. von Wachter has agreed to come to speak to us. You can see his very distinguished CV at http://von-wachter.de/#CV (with two doctorates in philosophy!), and details of his 60 publications at http://von-wachter.de/#Publications.

There are due to be nine or ten slots for papers to be presented at Tyndale next year. If you would like to be considered for a slot please e-mail an abstract (no more than a few hundred words) to djhill1972@gmail.com by Friday 20th December. We hope to let successful applicants know by Monday 6th January, in plenty of time for you to book in before the closure of the early-bird discounted period on 31st January 2020.

A reminder that abstracts are welcomed from people of all faiths or none, men or women, analytic or non-analytic philosophers.

Any inquiries please do get back to me.

With best wishes,

Daniel H.

2020 Barth Graduate Student Colloquium

The Center for Barth Studies at Princeton Theological Seminary is pleased to announce the fifth Karl Barth Graduate Student Colloquium to be held on August 19-21, 2020. This year’s theme is Barth and politics—broadly conceived as a constructive and critical engagement with Barth’s own politics, political theory, and political theology in conversation with contemporary conversations on the same. Over the course of three days, participants will have the opportunity to engage in an intensive student-led seminar and to get to know other up-and-coming Barth scholars. During the day, participants will take turns presenting papers and leading group discussion on an assigned portion of the text. Two senior scholars will supplement the student-led day sessions by providing evening lectures and opportunities to further the conversation.

We especially encourage women, people of color, international students, new voices, and other under-represented voices in the Barth discussion to submit proposals for this year’s colloquium.

Call for Papers

The text for the 2020 colloquium will be the essays found in Community, State, and Church. We are inviting doctoral students and recent graduates in the disciplines of theology, ethics, religion, and political philosophy. While we expect that all applicants will closely read Community, State, and Church in advance of the colloquium, papers may take up the political themes from anywhere in Barth’s corpus. Papers, therefore, are encouraged to be primarily constructive and thesis-driven, not exegetical. We hope that this set-up will foster fruitful and constructive conversations about the merits, utility, and limits of Barth’s own political thought in conversation with similar contemporary conversations.

Application Information: This colloquium is open to any doctoral student whose interests intersect with some aspect of Karl Barth’s theology. A focus on Barth’s theology in your dissertation is not required. ABD is preferred. Recent graduates may apply. Applicants are required to submit a CV and a statement of interest no longer than 750 words proposing a constructive paper on the colloquium’s theme. Applications should be sent to barth.center@ptsem.edu no later than Monday, March 2, 2020. Notification of acceptance will be made by Monday, March 30, 2020. Successful applicants will present a 20-25 minute paper and lead the discussion that follows. We especially encourage women, people of color, international students, new voices, and other under-represented voices in the Barth discussion to submit proposals for this year’s colloquium.

Cost: The colloquium begins Wednesday morning and concludes on Friday afternoon. All food and lodging during the colloquium will be provided. Lodging will begin on Tuesday evening, August 18. Modest travel stipends are also included.

Questions?: For more information see the Barth Center website or email barth.center@ptsem.edu.

Plenary Speaker – Hana Reichel

Dr. Reichel earned her ThD and MDiv from Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, holds a B.Sc. in economics from Fernuniversität Hagen and a BA (Vordiplom) in theology from Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn. Reichel’s published work includes articles on Karl Barth and the mission of the church, and a monograph titled, Theologie als Bekenntnis. Karl Barths kontextuelle Lektüre des Heidelberger Catechisms (FSÖTh, Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2015), eng. Theology as Confession: Karl Barth’s Contextual Readings of the Heidelberg Catechism. Her theological interests include Christology, scriptural hermeneutics, political theology, constructive theology, poststructuralist theory, and the theology of Karl Barth.

For more information see here: http://barth.ptsem.edu/event/2020-barth-graduate-student-colloquium

CFP: Engaging Particularities – Graduate Student Conference on Comparative Theology and Interreligious Dialogue at Boston College

In ritual, histories are made present, identity is conferred, community is constituted. Rituals mark life—births, deaths, and milestones in between. They connect some to the gods, send others to the Pure Land, and cast out devils and demons. Ritual remains one of the more enigmatic categories in the study of religion. Choices abound in defining, categorizing, and describing ritual and ritual spaces. Where do rituals happen, or not? What are the defining characteristics of “ritual”? Must religious traditions be inherently ritualistic? Do rituals abound outside of religious conceptions? What are the results of removing rituals from the traditional contexts? These considerations can be seen in a new light given the Western decline of institutional religion and its attending rituals.

How are rituals operative for religious communities today? What questions are raised, refocused, or answered in ritual encounters across religious boundaries? How do rituals mark—or subvert—insiders and outsiders, participants and observers? In what ways are memories handed down through ritual to communities of religious traditions?

Engaging Particularities XVIII invites scholars working in the fields of comparative theology, interreligious dialogue, theology of religions, religious studies, and missiology, to submit comparative proposals that consider the place of ritual in our world today, paying particular attention to the role rituals play in the formation of our identities, both personally and communally.

General Call

We also invite proposals on critical issues and themes from various disciplinary perspectives (such as but not limited to ethics, systematics, historical studies, biblical studies, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, etc.) in four areas: comparative theology, interreligious dialogue, theology of religions, and missiology.

Submission Guidelines

To submit a proposal, please email an abstract of no more than 250 words to epbcsubmissions@gmail.com by December 31, 2019. Please indicate whether you are submitting for the special focus or general call, and include your contact information, institution, and program. Funds are available on a limited basis for participants to help supplement travel expenses. For more information, please contact the Conference Director, Katie Mahowski Mylroie at mahowskm@bc.edu.

Engaging Particularities XVIII

CFP: Princeton Theological Seminary Graduate Student Conference 2020 -Christianity and the Social

Annual Princeton Theological Seminary Graduate Student Conference

March 27-28, Princeton, NJ

 

Call for Papers

 

Christianity and the Social

 

The planning committee for the annual PTS-GSC invites creative submissions which examine Christian reflection on social life, broadly conceived. Central Christian ideals involve ideas about social life—horizontally between humans, other creatures, and the earth, and vertically between humans, divine beings, and God. The Old Testament/Hebrew Bible portrays God’s social relationship with a variety of communities, especially Israel and its neighbors. These relations are mediated by covenants, lines of descent, temples, monarchies, and more. The New Testament portrays Jesus as inaugurating new social ties, turning strangers and enemies into friends and siblings. This cuts dramatically across religious, political, and ethnic lines.

 

Christian communities across the centuries have sought to apply what they take to be biblical and Christian ideals in the formation and regulation of their social lives. These social embodiments of Christianity have varied in interesting ways across time, culture, and place. Yet critics from without and within also note that Christian language and ideals often mask disturbing historical realities. Christians have often employed the language of these ideals in the service of empire, domination, slavery, and the like. Such a challenge raises important questions, both critical and constructive, and papers from a broad disciplinary range are welcomed, including but not limited to:

 

History
Biblical Studies

World Christianity

Religion and Society / Religion and Critical Thought

Political Theory

Theology
Ethics
Philosophy

Sociology

Spirituality

Practical Theology

Hermeneutics

 

We welcome proposals for 15-20 minute paper presentations. Please send paper proposals of around 300 words to andrew.peterson@ptsem.edu and nicola.whyte@ptsem.edu by December 15, 2019, stating your institutional affiliation and program.

 

Presentations are expected to be “on the way,” so to speak—they needn’t be publishable in their present form, but we do want well-formulated and thought-provoking presentations. They may explicitly address the conference theme, or they may demonstrate how the conference theme is reflected in a specific area of study. We encourage presentations related to seminar papers, comprehensive exam materials, or dissertation materials. We especially encourage proposals from underrepresented groups in the academy.

CFP: Scripture and Theology 2020 (European Academy of Religion)

Christianity relates to the Bible. Yet here the questions begin: How have the Scriptures been received theologically through the centuries? How can biblical studies and systematic theology interact in fruitful ways and be fruitful for the Christian faith in the context of the 21st century? What is the theological status of the Bible?

These are some of the leading questions for the study group on ‘Scripture and Theology’. The first meeting of the study group was part of the second Annual Conference of the European Academy of Religion, EuARe 2019. In 2020, the study group again convenes scholars from various countries and denominations at EuARe 2020, and we continue to aim at a critical-constructive dialogue on how to be responsible practitioners of theology.

Submission Guidelines

The panel welcomes contributions from all theological traditions. Papers will be selected via a peer-reviewing process based on scholarly quality and their relevance for the panel. As the panel will consist of several slots, we will assemble sub-topics for each slot.

We aim to distribute the papers to respondents and registered participants in advance, in order to allow better preparation and feedback for the given papers. However, making papers accessible this way is not strictly mandatory.

Please turn in your contributions via the chair (Michael.Borowski@gmx.de), as well as any further questions you may have.

For registration and other organisational matter regarding the conference of the European Academy of Religion, and for information about the academy itself, please refer to https://www.europeanacademyofreligion.org/euare2020.

Formal Requirements

  • Abstracts: 500 to 1000 words (including a short summary of up to 150 words), plus references
  • Papers for publication: 5000 to 7000 words
  • Oral presentations: 20 minutes, followed by 20 minutes discussion (including up to 5 min response by an invited respondee).

All papers must be original and not simultaneously submitted to another journal or conference.

Dates

  • December 31, 2019: Deadline for submissions of abstracts
  • January 31, 2020: Acceptance notification
  • June 1, 2020: Full papers due (for respondents and registered participants)
  • June 22–25, 2020: Panel at EuARe 2020
  • September 1, 2020: Submission of camera-ready version for collected volume

List of Topics

Possible topics comprise (but are not restricted to):

  • Scripture and/as revelations
  • Scripture and Tradition
  • Scripture and authority
  • Scripture in various theological traditions
  • The role of Scripture in theological debates
  • Scripture and Christian life
  • The canon and the canonical
  • Hermeneutics in theology
  • Myth and History
  • Form and content in Scripture
  • Scripture and contemporary challenges

Committees

Program Committee

  • Nikolaos Asproulis (Volos Academy for Theological Studies, Greece)
  • Gijsbert van den Brink (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
  • Hans Burger (Researchgroup BEST, Theologische Universiteit Kampen, The Netherlands)
  • Mark Elliott (University of Glasgow, United Kingdom)
  • Arnold Huijgen (Researchgroup BEST, Theologische Universiteit Apeldoorn, The Netherlands)
  • John Milbank (University of Nottingham, United Kingdom)
  • Thomas Söding (Ruhr University Bochum, Germany)

Organizing committee

  • Tomas Bokedal (NLA Bergen, Norway & University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom)
  • Michael Borowski (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
  • Ludger Jansen (University of Rostock & University of Passau, Germany)

Publication

We intend to publish a selection of the papers together with contributions from S&T 2019 in a collected volume, edited biannually by the study group

Venue

The conference will be held in one of the EuARe-Venues TBA.

Contact

All questions about submissions should be emailed to michael.borowski@gmx.de