Category: Conferences

CFP: Society for the Study of Christian Ethics 2020 Conference

In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the SSCE Committee has decided that the ‘Bible and Christian Ethics’ conference due to take place in
September 2020 will be postponed until 8-10 September, 2022. It is intended that the 2021 Conference will run as planned. Please see
the 2021 Conference page and 2022 Conference page for more information on these future events.

In lieu of the postponed full conference, we are pleased to announce that SSCE 2020 will comprise a single-day series of online seminars
and an online AGM on Friday 11th September 2020. Please see the Conference Information page for further information as it appears,
and the Call for Papers page for details of the seminar themes and how to propose a short paper presentation.

  

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  The Society for the Study of Christian Ethics:

  • holds an annual conference which attracts leading scholars and practitioners from academia, politics, the church and society
    throughout the United Kingdom, continental Europe, and the United States;
  • sponsors the leading scholarly journal Studies in Christian Ethics, published quarterly;
  • sponsors a postgraduate forum with regular conferences and support for PhD students;
  • and maintains a database of members and their interests, enabling others to identify colleagues who are working in areas
    similar to their own.

  The objectives of the Society:

  • to encourage and further the study of Christian ethics in its practical and theoretical aspects;
  • to strengthen the teaching and learning of ethics as an academic discipline;
  • to encourage serious ethical thinking and discussion in the life of churches;
  • to foster the exercise of Christian social responsibility;
  • to hold a Conference and at least one General Meeting of the Society in each calendar year

  Membership

  • We welcome the participation of those who are share these objectives. Join the society and become a member to be kept
    informed of our news and events, or attend the annual conference. The full constitution of the Society is also available.
  • By becoming a member of the society, you will also receive an online account, which will enable you to use a number of
    members-only sections of our website: to submit a conference paper proposal and to register for our conferences.
  • If you have already created an account for use on this system, you can login by clicking on the “Login” button above.
    If you think you may need an account for our site without becoming a member, please contact the SSCE Honorary Secretary.

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Southeastern Symposium – April 16 & 17

From the Southeastern Symposium:

The Southeastern Symposium is an online event showcasing scholarly work by the SEBTS faculty, alumni, and students. We are proud to be able to bring you a virtual event that represents several different areas of study.

The event will take place on April 16-17. A formal schedule of plenaries and seminars will be released shortly. The symposium will start at 1pm on April 16 and conclude on the evening of April 17. During the smaller breakouts, we will allow participants to post questions to the presenter. Exciting resources and opportunities may also be presented from our partners.

April 16

Opening Session 1:00pm – 5:30pm

April 17

Morning Session – 9:00am – 1:20pm
Afternoon Session – 1:30pm – 6:45pm

Register at: https://apply.sebts.edu/register/southeasternsymposium

Please click here for a Schedule of the Sessions for the Southeastern Symposium.

CFP: Christian Theology in the Midst of COVID-19 – Society for the Study of Theology

Christian Theology in the Midst of COVID-19
Online conference: Wednesday 17th June, 12:00-18:00 British Summer Time

Invitation and call for papers

It is planned that the conference will take place online on Wednesday 17th June from 12:00 to 18:00 British Summer time. Details of the online platform to be used will be confirmed later.

This online conference is an attempt to stimulate some initial theological reflection on the global COVID-19 pandemic. Topics for discussion could include: reading the Scriptures in a time of pandemic; historical Christian responses to plagues and pandemics; divine providence, justice and mercy in relation to COVID-19; politics, economics and the common good; ecclesiology, liturgy, worship and mission; ethical questions; questions about trauma, suffering and loss; how to resource the churches’ responses.

Proposals for papers of up to 3,000 words are invited on any of the topics outlined above, or others related to the theme. Since this is an initial exercise in theological reflection, it is recognised that papers might present first thoughts rather than definitive conclusions about the topics addressed. However, academic rigour and potential to make a valuable contribution to the discussion will nonetheless be the criteria used to selecting papers for presentation.

It is anticipated that each paper will have a 30-40 minute time slot. The presenter will have up to 10 minutes to give a brief introduction to the paper, and the remainder of the time will be for discussion. Papers will be circulated to all participants one week before the conference, and presenters should therefore submit them two weeks before the conference date (i.e. by 3rd June).

To submit a paper proposal, please e-mail an abstract of up to 250 words by Thursday 30th April to the organiser, Prof. Neil Messer: Neil.Messer@winchester.ac.uk

To register for the conference, please send your name and email address by Wednesday 27th May to:Neil.Messer@winchester.ac.uk.

For full details, please follow this link.

Christian Philosophy: Its Past, Present, and Future

From SCP:

September 22–24, 2020
Jesuit University Ignatianum in Krakow, Poland

We are happy to invite you to the conference organized by Jesuit University Ignatianum in Krakow. We hope that you may find it inspiring. Please see the Call For Papers below:

The conference is addressed to the representatives of Christian Philosophy, and researchers who are inspired by it. Two thousand years ago, when Christianity encountered Greek and Roman philosophy, Christian thought was born. This encounter, as John Paul II noticed (Fides et ratio, IV.38), was “neither straight-forward nor immediate”. It was also based on the presupposition that synthesis of faith and reason is not only possible, more so, necessary. Many contemporary thinkers, even if they not declare themselves as Christians or religious believers, who examine philosophical problems and search the truth, seem to be open to this mystery, which is experienced by faith.

In our Academy, Jesuit University Ignatianum in Krakow, we develop Christian Philosophy since 1867—that is to say, we participate in long and rich tradition of philosophizing. This tradition will be continued and developed, if only Christian Philosophy will be able to respond to contemporary philosophical, ethical and social problems. During the conference, we will also present the results of four-year research project, funded by Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education, which conducted by our colleagues.

Proposals
We invite proposals that address the problems of Christian Philosophy. We are particularly interested in the following topics and questions, but any research on the conference theme is welcome.

Main problems and questions worth considering
•       What is a Christian Philosophy?
•       Methods of practicing Christian Philosophy
•       Faith & Reason – how this relationship was understood throughout the ages and how should we understand it today?
•       Interaction of Christian Philosophy with different paradigms of philosophy and religions
•       Great Christian Philosophers
•       Can Christianity provide a creative inspiration to solve the problems of philosophy?

Proposal Requirements
Proposal Submission: Please submit a 500-word abstract of your paper (in PDF format) by April 20. Link to submission will be enabled on March 1.

Language: we accept proposals in English exclusively.

Fees: TBA

How to Submit: Please submit a 500-word abstract of your paper (in PDF format) by March 31. Submissions will be handled through the online form, which will be available from March 1. The link to the form will be included on our website. Please follow our Facebook profile (Christian Philosophy Conference), and Twitter (@christianphilo4) to be in touch. Each accepted presentation should not exceed a 20-minute time slot. There will be maximum 20 mins for a talk, and minimum 10 mins for a discussion afterwards.

Keynote speakers
·       Robert Alexander Pruss, Baylor University, Texas, USA
·       Ted Peters, Graduate Theological Union (GTU) in Berkeley, California, USA
·       John Hittinger, University of St. Thomas, Houston, Texas, USA

Registration  
The conference is open to the public. Speakers will be charged with the costs of conference (materials, dinner, etc.)—the exact fee will be announced in the upcoming weeks.

Thus, we invite you to attend, regardless of whether or not you are presenting. However, we will have limited space, so please register for the conference, so we know that you are coming. Starting May 1, you will be able to register via online form. The deadline for registering is June 30, 2020.

If you have questions, please contact the conference secretary at christianphilosophy2020@ignatianum.edu.pl

Publication
After the conference we plan to publish a special issue in a philosophical journal with the articles based on the conference speeches. The speakers are encouraged to prepare a paper (up to 15,000 words) and submit it by December 31. Each article goes through the process of double-blind peer review. Forum Philosophicum, international journal for philosophy, has already agreed to publish a special issue in 2021 including the materials from the conference, though we are also open to the collaboration with other journals.

Deadlines
·       Submission of Proposals: March 1—31, 2020
·       Notification of Acceptance: April 30, 2020
·       Registration Deadline: June 30, 2020
·       Conference Dates: September 22–24, 2020
·       Paper Submission Deadline: December 31, 2020
More information on our website: www.christianphilosophy.ignatianum.edu.pl

 

CFP: London School of Theology Research Conference 2020

From LST:

We are delighted to announce that Dr Andrew M. Steane, co-author of the book It Keeps Me Seeking, will be the Guest Speaker at the 2020 LST Research Conference.

Dr Steane is a Professor of Physics (Atomic and Laser) at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of Exeter College. His research is focused on the nature of quantum mechanics. He is an author of many books, amongst them a book that explores role of science in religion.

Proposals for papers, including from graduate students, are invited to besubmitted by Thursday 5th March. Notification of acceptance will be given by Tuesday 10th March.

Although proposals from all areas of theological research are welcome, those closest to the theme of the conference will be given preference.

All proposals should be submitted with an abstract of not less than 200 and not more than 300 words.

Students may be asked to provide a full text of their paper by Tuesday 10th March for a decision by Tuesday 17th March.

Student papers are not to exceed 25 minutes. Other papers are not to exceed 45 minutes. All papers will be followed by a discussion.

For more information see: https://lst.ac.uk/meeting/research-conference-2020/

Logos 2020 – Narrative, Personhood, and the Self – May 28-30, 2020 at the University of Notre Dame

Issues concerning “the self”—its nature, our knowledge of it, mechanisms for transforming it, and much else besides—are historically central and currently active areas of research in philosophy, theology, and psychology.  An increasingly important idea in all three disciplines is the view that narrative is somehow essential to the self and intimately connected with key aspects of the life and development of a person. Narrative, or the activity of constructing narratives, has been credited with all manner of different roles in our lives, from contributing to positive outcomes in the wake of trauma, to helping us make sense of and find meaning in our own actions and other events that make up our lives, to unifying our consciousness and explaining important aspects of our agency, to constituting us as persons. The 2020 Logos Workshop will bring together philosophers, biblical scholars, and theologians to discuss these and related issues about personhood, the self, and the role narrative might play in the construction and transformation of the self.

Logos 2020 will be the final, large scale workshop in this series at Notre Dame. We have run this conference since 2009, and it has been an important event in the life of our Center. Nevertheless, we feel that the time has come to draw it to a close. It has been an immensely rewarding experience, and we are thankful that we have been able to host it for so many years. We hope that the research and relationships cultivated and deepened at Logos will continue to grow even as our workshop comes to an end.

The workshop is open to all who wish to attend, but registration is required. Registration details.

ATTENTION: Because the number of registrants affects our costs for refreshment breaks and other aspects of the conference, and because workshop presenters come with the expectation that their work-in-progress will not be circulated beyond the conference attendees, we ask that you DO NOT REGISTER for the conference IF YOU DO NOT PLAN TO ATTEND. If you are not attending and want access to the papers, please contact the authors directly.

The Center for Philosophy of Religion is committed to accommodating people with disabilities. Workshop participants are more than welcome to contact us to discuss possible accommodations if needed.

For more details see here: https://philreligion.nd.edu/events/logos-workshop/logos-2020/?fbclid=IwAR060HFoDxa7MoPKwDBBl6PQ_nPvXk41vBBUkYj_sA1ecJpBCOf3nLS-oSg

Eleventh International Thomistic Congress

21-25 September 2020 | Rome, Italy

Theme of the 11th Congress: Vetera novis augere. The resources of the Thomist tradition in the current context.

The general scientific objective of the XIth International Thomistic Congress is to consider new perspectives in the study of Saint Thomas (interests, methods and results) in order to highlight the resources of the Thomist tradition in contemporary theological and philosophical debates.

Invitation

The Pontifical Academy of Saint Thomas Aquinas and the Thomistic Institute of the Angelicum invite you to the XI International Thomistic Congress, to be held in Rome from Monday 21 September to Friday 25 September 2020 (Pontifical University of Saint Thomas Aquinas in Urba).

A unique opportunity to share work, research and friendships with the best international specialists in the thought of Saint Thomas Aquinas.

The languages of the Congress are Italian, French, Spanish and English. Simultaneous translations will be provided for the plenary sessions.

Call for Contributors

Anyone wishing to take part in the work of the Congress (teachers, researchers, doctoral students) is cordially invited to propose a paper (25-30 minutes maximum, strictly). The full text or an expanded abstract of the presentation (between 1500 and 2000 characters, spaces included) should be sent to the following address: romathomism2020@gmail.combefore April 15, 2020. Please indicate the workshop (session section) in which this communication could take place (see the lists above under Afternoon Workshops, for each day). The response (acceptance/refusal) of the organizers will be communicated before 30 June 2020. The text of the accepted papers will be published in the Proceedings of the Congress.

Christology and Metaphysics: Thomism in Conversation

Thursday April 2, 2020. A colloquium on Christology & Metaphyics, co-hosted by the School of Divinity and the Thomistic Institute (Angelicum, Rome)

Emmanuel Durand, OP (Thomistic Institute)
“Should the Cross be the Revelation of the Trinity?”

Simon Oliver (Durham)
“’All things came into being through him’: Christological Metaphysics and the Doctrine of Creation”

Christoph Schwöbel (St Andrews)
“Taking the Form of a Servant – Kenosis and Divine Self-Giving in Thomas Aquinas and Martin Luther”

Thomas Joseph White, OP (Thomistic Institute)
“The Communication of Idioms: The Chalcedonian Tradition and its Metaphysical Implications”

The Trinity and the Kenosis of Christ

The Thomistic Institute Angelicum hosts a two-day conference.

Schedule

Friday, 21 February 2020

12:00 PM to 1:00 PM: Gilles Emery, OP
     Christ’s Kenosis: Biblical Exegesis, Christology, Metaphysics, and Trinitarian Theology in Saint Thomas Aquinas

1:00 PM to 2:00 PM: Lunch Break 

2:00 PM to 3:00 PM: Christoph Schwöbel
     “Taking the Form of a Servant” – Kenosis and Divine Self-Giving in Thomas Aquinas and Martin Luther

3:00 PM to 3:30PM: Coffee Break

3:30 PM to 4:30 PM: Emmanuel Durand, OP
     Should the Cross be The Revelation of the Trinity?

4:30 PM to 5:00 PM: Coffee Break

5:00 PM to 6:00 PM: Christophe Chalamet
     ‘A mediator involves more than one party’ (Gal. 3:20) – Kenosis and Covenant

Saturday, 22 February 2020

12:00 PM to 1:00 PM: Thomas Joseph White, OP
     The Two Natures of Christ in the Crucifixion

1:00 PM to 2:00 PM: Lunch Break

2:00 PM to 3:00 PM: Michele Schumacher
     Trinity in Balthasar and Aquinas

3:00 PM to 3:30PM: Coffee Break

3:30 PM to 4:30 PM: Bruce Marshall
     Personal Distinction in God and the Possibility of Kenosis

4:30 PM to 5:00 PM: Coffee Break

5:00 PM to 6:00 PM: Martin Bieler
     The Cross of Christ as a Trinitarian Act

Duke University Graduate Conference in Theology

March 20-21, 2020

Call For Papers

The sixth annual Duke Graduate Conference in Theology is pleased to invite proposals that engage the intersections of liberation, reconciliation, and Latin America. Proposals that engage these themes from a wide variety of disciplinary perspectives are welcomed including (but not limited to): systematic theology, liturgical studies, ethics, historical theology, world Christianity, political theology, and biblical studies.  Successful proposals will also show an appropriate level of engagement with experiences and voices from Latin American culture, people, and/or history. 

Submission Guidelines

Please submit paper proposals of no more than 300 words by December 20. Proposals should be emailed to dgct2020@gmail.com in the form of a Word document attachment. Please include your name, institution, and degree program in the e-mail. Proposals will be evaluated anonymously by peer review. Notifications of acceptance will be distributed by December 31, and final, full manuscripts will be due on 12pm, Monday, March 9. Presenters will have 15-20 minutes to present their papers in faculty-moderated panels. 

About the Conference Theme

March 24, 2020 marks the 40th anniversary of the martyrdom Saint Oscar Arnulfo Romero. During his time as Archbishop of San Salvador, Romero exhibited the rare and powerful combination of pastoral sensibility, theological attunement, and prophetic zeal, which he exercised on behalf of the poor and the oppressed people of El Salvador. The life of Romero is especially relevant today given current socio-political realities both in the U.S. and across the world, which make it seem almost impossible to pursue the work of liberation and reconciliation in tandem.The witness of Romero’s life and death continues to be a call for the church in Latin America and across the world to listen for the voice of Christ in the cries of the poor and the oppressed and to live in ways that bear witness to the liberating and reconciling work of Christ.

Paper Topics may include:

  • How can churches as ecclesiastical communities speak truth to power in a volatile society?
  • What role does violence play in our theologizing of history?
  • How have the themes of liberation and reconciliation that originated in the Latin American context been received in other regions of the world, such as Africa, Asia and Europe?
  • How have theological and ecclesial practice been shaped by anti-colonial thinking that originated in Latin America?
  • How do/can Christian ecclesial practices (e.g. worship) respond to social and systemic violence?
  • What forms of spirituality or religious practice have supported liberating and reconciling work?
  • How do practices of biblical interpretation shape the work of liberation and reconciliation?
  • Theology and advocacy for the poor and marginalized
  • Latin American theologies and lo cotidiano
  • Critical evaluation of the terms “liberation” and “reconciliation”

The Duke Graduate Conference in Theology provides an annual forum for graduate students from Duke and other institutions to promote and foster the exchange of ideas among those studying in various theological disciplines.

Thomas Aquinas and Christology

Conference Website here.

Ave Maria University, the Aquinas Center, and the Thomistic Institute

FEBRUARY 6-8, 2020

This conference considers a wide range of scriptural, historical, and systematic attempts at answering Jesus’ question and engages in the thinking of Thomas Aquinas on it. His teaching on Christ reflects a master of the sacred page who attended adroitly to the scriptural narrative of Christ’s actions and sufferings, pioneered in the West the recovery of ancient conciliar teaching, innovated in his Christological pedagogy, and elucidated Trinitarian, anthropological, sacramental, moral, and eschatological dimensions of Christology. Studying the mystery of Christ in dialogue with Aquinas can assist us in today’s crisis of Christology.

Keynotes by Bruce Marshall and Thomas Joseph White, O.P; plenaries include Oliver Crisp and Dominic Legge; many concurrent sessions.

Tyndale Fellowship Conference 2020: “Doing Theology in a World on the Move – Migration, Borders and Citizenship”

Tyndale Fellowship Conference 2020

Doing Theology in a World on the Move – Migration, Borders and Citizenship

Monday 29 June – Wednesday 1 July 2020

High Leigh Conference Centre, Lord Street, Hoddesdon, Herts EN11 8SG

 

Tyndale Fellowship offers an opportunity to engage with the best of evangelical scholarship, and to meet other researchers from around the world.

In the new self, there is no Greek and Jew, circumcised and uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave, free, but Christ is all and in all.

It raises all sorts of issues when large numbers from a specific people group move outside their customary borders (irrespective of whether they are forced to move or do so voluntarily). In the past we have seen movements from wealthy and powerful parts of the world to less powerful areas (colonialism). Nowadays we also see the reverse (refugee crisis, economic migration). In response we have seen the rise of schools of thought such as post-colonialism, unhealthy nationalism, and also a reversal of internationalism.

There are no easy answers to complex questions, but as evangelicals, how do we think about these issues? What does Christ urge us to do? How does God’s Word help us to be shining lights? What are the parallels we see in Scripture? What are their limitations? Do we need to separate our ‘national identity’ from our ‘Christian identity’? How should we plead the cause of the orphan and the widow? Should we perhaps just concentrate on the Gospel opportunities which the migration phenomenon offers us?

For more information see here: https://academic.tyndalehouse.com/TFC-2020

 

 

CFP: Engaging Particularities – Graduate Student Conference on Comparative Theology and Interreligious Dialogue at Boston College

In ritual, histories are made present, identity is conferred, community is constituted. Rituals mark life—births, deaths, and milestones in between. They connect some to the gods, send others to the Pure Land, and cast out devils and demons. Ritual remains one of the more enigmatic categories in the study of religion. Choices abound in defining, categorizing, and describing ritual and ritual spaces. Where do rituals happen, or not? What are the defining characteristics of “ritual”? Must religious traditions be inherently ritualistic? Do rituals abound outside of religious conceptions? What are the results of removing rituals from the traditional contexts? These considerations can be seen in a new light given the Western decline of institutional religion and its attending rituals.

How are rituals operative for religious communities today? What questions are raised, refocused, or answered in ritual encounters across religious boundaries? How do rituals mark—or subvert—insiders and outsiders, participants and observers? In what ways are memories handed down through ritual to communities of religious traditions?

Engaging Particularities XVIII invites scholars working in the fields of comparative theology, interreligious dialogue, theology of religions, religious studies, and missiology, to submit comparative proposals that consider the place of ritual in our world today, paying particular attention to the role rituals play in the formation of our identities, both personally and communally.

General Call

We also invite proposals on critical issues and themes from various disciplinary perspectives (such as but not limited to ethics, systematics, historical studies, biblical studies, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, etc.) in four areas: comparative theology, interreligious dialogue, theology of religions, and missiology.

Submission Guidelines

To submit a proposal, please email an abstract of no more than 250 words to epbcsubmissions@gmail.com by December 31, 2019. Please indicate whether you are submitting for the special focus or general call, and include your contact information, institution, and program. Funds are available on a limited basis for participants to help supplement travel expenses. For more information, please contact the Conference Director, Katie Mahowski Mylroie at mahowskm@bc.edu.

Engaging Particularities XVIII

CFP: Princeton Theological Seminary Graduate Student Conference 2020 -Christianity and the Social

Annual Princeton Theological Seminary Graduate Student Conference

March 27-28, Princeton, NJ

 

Call for Papers

 

Christianity and the Social

 

The planning committee for the annual PTS-GSC invites creative submissions which examine Christian reflection on social life, broadly conceived. Central Christian ideals involve ideas about social life—horizontally between humans, other creatures, and the earth, and vertically between humans, divine beings, and God. The Old Testament/Hebrew Bible portrays God’s social relationship with a variety of communities, especially Israel and its neighbors. These relations are mediated by covenants, lines of descent, temples, monarchies, and more. The New Testament portrays Jesus as inaugurating new social ties, turning strangers and enemies into friends and siblings. This cuts dramatically across religious, political, and ethnic lines.

 

Christian communities across the centuries have sought to apply what they take to be biblical and Christian ideals in the formation and regulation of their social lives. These social embodiments of Christianity have varied in interesting ways across time, culture, and place. Yet critics from without and within also note that Christian language and ideals often mask disturbing historical realities. Christians have often employed the language of these ideals in the service of empire, domination, slavery, and the like. Such a challenge raises important questions, both critical and constructive, and papers from a broad disciplinary range are welcomed, including but not limited to:

 

History
Biblical Studies

World Christianity

Religion and Society / Religion and Critical Thought

Political Theory

Theology
Ethics
Philosophy

Sociology

Spirituality

Practical Theology

Hermeneutics

 

We welcome proposals for 15-20 minute paper presentations. Please send paper proposals of around 300 words to andrew.peterson@ptsem.edu and nicola.whyte@ptsem.edu by December 15, 2019, stating your institutional affiliation and program.

 

Presentations are expected to be “on the way,” so to speak—they needn’t be publishable in their present form, but we do want well-formulated and thought-provoking presentations. They may explicitly address the conference theme, or they may demonstrate how the conference theme is reflected in a specific area of study. We encourage presentations related to seminar papers, comprehensive exam materials, or dissertation materials. We especially encourage proposals from underrepresented groups in the academy.

AAR Places QR Codes on Name Badges but Reverses Their Decision

An email sent to AAR meeting attendees


Dear 2019 Annual Meeting Attendee,

This year, AAR and SBL decided to try a one-year pilot program of placing QR codes on attendee name badges, as a number of other associations do. The pilot was implemented with the sole aim of promoting fair use of name badges, and not for tracking individuals, holding on to personal data, or policing—which would go directly against our values and philosophy. We deeply regret the unintended messages the pilot idea triggered and have immediately withdrawn it. We are sending the badges for the Annual Meeting without the QR codes on Monday, November 11. In this spirit, we thank our members for their responses. We assure our members that trust is part of our ethos and that we will keep striving toward it. The AAR takes seriously that it exists because of, and for, all its members and those interested in the academic study of religion.

Alice Hunt,

Executive Director

Aberdeen: Towards the Future of Protestant Theology

4th–6th June 2020, University of Aberdeen

From the conference website:

Following in the wake of the recent celebrations of the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, this conference seeks to facilitate conversation concerning possible directions, opportunities, and challenges for theologies belonging to the Protestant confessions. Bringing together scholars from a range of traditions and contexts, it looks to explore core doctrinal topics, to provoke further thinking in the discipline, and to foster global research networks.

Conference Plenary Speakers—

  • Christiane Tietz, University of Zürich
  • Keith Johnson, Wheaton College
  • Susannah Ticciati, King’s College London
  • Simon Oliver, Durham University
  • Keri Day, Princeton Theological Seminary
  • Roland Chia, Trinity Theological College Singapore
  • Tinyiko Maluleke, University of Pretoria
  • Daniel Castelo, Seattle Pacific University
  • Makhosazana Nzimande, Rector of All Saints, Ladysmith, South Africa and Vice-Moderator of the upcoming Assembly of the World Council of Churches 2020
  • Sarah Stewart-Kroeker, University of Geneva
  • David Fergusson, University of Edinburgh

We expect to issue a Call for Papers in the near future to solicit several short paper presentations from postgraduate students.  More to follow!

CFP: 2020 Convivium Conference ‘Inhabiting Memories & Landscapes’: a cross-disciplinary engagement with Wendell Berry

This might be of interest for those who are work on the topic of “theology of place” and especially those who are interested in the theology of Wendell Berry.


In his novels, poetry, and essays, the American Agrarian writer, philosopher, and farmer Wendell Berry frequently speaks of the need to be ‘placed’, to inhabit a particular landscape and its social memory over an extended period of time. This, he believes, is a necessary precondition for fostering communities that care for the earth and the people who live off it—what he refers to as conviviality.

 

This conference will offer an interdisciplinary exploration of notions of conviviality, social well-being, and the good life that are rooted in the interplay of local landscapes, memory/heritage, and social identities. How have societies in the past inhabited memory and their landscapes? In a time of increasing globalization and networked societies? What models are there from around the world for sustainable communities that also value heritage? How might contextual approaches to research better account for landscapes and heritage? How are social memories and local landscapes impacted by current concerns about misinformation and the climate crisis? What economic, social, environmental, and political policies today might wendell-berry-c-guy-mendes_crop-e1563466456950encourage a ‘convivial’ engagement with local heritage and conservation?

The conference will feature keynote lectures, interdisciplinary paper panels, and a concluding panel discussion, as well as a Cathedral tour and a possible walk taking in local landscape and heritage. We invite papers and panels from across disciplines that engage either with the writings of Wendell Berry or with the interplay of memory/heritage, landscape, and social identity.

Possible topics could include but are not limited to:

  • Any aspect of the fiction, poetry, or essays of Wendell Berry
  • Writings about nature and place in an age of globalization
  • Memory, local landscapes, and place in regional literature, historical studies, and theology
  • Concepts of and attitudes towards memory, local landscapes, and place in a globalised society
  • Concepts of ‘placed’ sociology, economics, and political theory
  • Past and present notions of ‘conviviality’ or the good life that account for harmonious relationships with local environments and heritage
  • Intersections of the local and global and their impact on social memory, landscapes, and identity
  • Impact of tourism on local connections with inhabited landscapes and historic sites
  • Connections between nature and heritage conservation
  • Environmental ethics and approaches to localism that account for local heritage, religion and culture

We invite abstracts of approximately 250 words for

  • 20-minute papers
  • pre-formed 90-minute panels (please send an abstract for each paper)
  • poster presentations which will be displayed for the duration of the conference

Please send abstracts, accompanied by a short biographical note to rescanon@breconcathedral.org.uk. by 16th March 2020. Please note that the organisers will not accept proposals for all male panels.

CFP: “Vengeance is Mine” – Christianity, Violence, and Peace

CFP from Megan Gooley, Conference Chair, Fordham TGSA


Greetings,

I am writing on behalf of the Fordham Theology Graduate Student Association with a call for papers for our annual graduate conference.  The conference theme is “Vengeance is Mine”: Christianity, Violence, and Peace and will feature Dr. George Demacopoulos as the keynote speaker. We would very much appreciate it if you would share the attached call for papers with any graduate students in theology, religious studies, ethics, and any other related social science and humanities fields.ge Demacopoulos as the keynote speaker. We would very much appreciate it if you would share the attached call for papers with any graduate students in theology, religious studies, ethics, and any other related social science and humanities fields.

Proposals should be sent to fordhamtgsa@gmail.com by January 17, 2020. Students should feel free to reach out to that email with any questions as well.

Vengance is Mine

CFP: GOD, TIME AND CHANGE

GOD, TIME AND CHANGE

Call for Papers


23rd Conference of the European Society for Philosophy of Religion

God, Time and Change

University of Leeds, UK: 3–5 September 2020

This conference investigates the impact of time and change, as two facets of human experience and cognition, on conceptions of God, the divine and ultimate reality. While being a rich source for metaphysical speculation, questions about time and change also provoke discussion of what it means to be human, thereby having profound ethical and social implications. Reflection on time and change in relation to God, the divine or ultimate reality forms the philosophical core of many religious traditions, both theistic and non-theistic. The question, for instance, of whether or not temporality and change should be conceived as inherent attributes of God has been a focus of debate within philosophy of religion since antiquity. Time and change continue to be topics of ongoing research within many academic disciplines. The conference brings current philosophical and scientific theories of time and change into conversation with perspectives from the philosophy of religion.

Call for short papers

Short papers (with a reading time of 20 minutes) are invited in either English or German on the above topics. The questions are suggestive rather than restrictive. Please send abstracts (with a maximum of 15 lines) to espr@godtimeandchange.com by 15th April 2020. You will be notified of the outcome by the end of April. If you need an earlier decision in order to apply for funding, please state this when you submit your abstract and submit the abstract as early as possible. Inquiries can be directed to espr@godtimeandchange.com

Keynote Speakers:

Prof. Robin Le Poidevin, Professor of Metaphysics, University of Leeds, UK

Prof. Lubos Rojka, Professor of Systematic Theology and Philosophy of Religion, Gregorian University, Rome

Prof. Dr. Heiko Schulz, Professor for Systematic Theology and Philosophy of Religion, Faculty for Protestant Theology, Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany

Prof. Marcel Sarot, Professor of Fundamental Theology, Tilburg University, Utrecht Netherlands

Prof. Marius Timman Mjaaland, Professor of Religion, University of Oslo, Sweden

Dr Jessica Frazier, Hindu Studies and Philosophy of Religion, Trinity College, University of Oxford and Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies, Oxford, UK

Prof. Jayne Svenungsson, Professor of Systematic Theology, University of Lund, Sweden

Prof. Carla Canullo, Professor of Theoretical Philosophy, University of Macerata, Italy

About the ESPR: The European Society for Philosophy of Religion provides a forum for researchers employing different approaches to the philosophy of religion. See http://www.philosophy-of-religion.org

The conference website: http://godtimeandchange.com


For the full CFP see: https://www.godtimeandchange.com/